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Full text of "Enter Magazine Number 14"

HILDREN'S TELEVISION 



WORKSHOP • JAN/FEB 1985 • $1.75 






THE WORLD OF COMPUTERS AND NEW^EWNOLOGY 



COMPUTER GREATS 
& GLITCHES 

The First Annua! ENTER Awards 



PROGRAMMING 

ROCK & ROM: How 

Computers Created 1984 's 
Top Rock Videos 




Printer Power: 
Low-Price, High-Grade 



Wmi': Sea-worthy Software 



Laser Amazers 
"^ in Arcades 





Hopping Copycats: Q* Bert Clones 




'J 



Mac Attacic 
A l\Souse Tliat Roars 



The advantages of owning the IBM PCjr. 




MosI of the good things about 
haungPCjr around have to 
do ivith the computer itself. 
But some of the gtuMl thhigs 
dout, if you catch my drift. 



Uttle Jiamp character licensed by BuiJbles Inc.. s.a. 



by Andy Cunningham 



My friend Jill liere (it's not 
quite to the "girlfriend" stage 
yet) likes my PCjr almost as 
much as she likes me. Maybe 
more. Every time she's got a 
paper or something to do, she 
comes over here to do it. 




One adviudagp PCjr has 
over other computers is the 
mtesome amount of stuff 
you coil get to go ukh it. 
GmneSf printers, monitors, 
modems, jitysticks —five 
birthdays' north at least. 

That's the way it goes when 
you get a computer. "Vbur friends 
will expect you to let them use it. 
Some of them will even expect 
you to teach them how. 

I don't really mind. For one 
thing, they're my friends. And for 
another thing, for such a powerful 
computer, PQV is easy to leai'n. So 
getting somebody started on it isn't 
any big deal. (Especially 
somebody as intelligent 
and talented as Jill.) 
You know all the 
things you can buy to 
customize a car? Well, 
IBM has all kinds of things 
(they call them'^peripherals") 
to customize a PCjr. If you want to 
play games, you'll probably want 
a couple of joysticks. If you have 
to write term papers (it's not a 
question of wanting), you'll need 




a printer: If you want to connect 
up to electronic information 
libraries over the telephone 
(you'd be amazed at how many 
there are), you'll have to have 
something called a modem. 

What you end up buying 
besides the computer itself all 
depends on what you plan to use 
the computer for. But whatever 
you have in mind, PCjr can prob- 
ably handle it. That's because 
IBM designed this computer to 
accept all kinds of pei'ipherals. 
including things that haven't even 
been invented yet. 

I don't want to get too tech- 
nical on you, but there's one 
technical thing you ought to 
know about the PCjr. It works 
exactly the same as the original 



IBM PCjr SPECIFICATIOIVS 


Memory 


Software 


User Memory (RAM): 


Runs over 1. 000 programs 


64.128KB 


written for the IBM PC 


{expandable 10 &1ZKB) 


Runs both diskette and 


Permanenl Memory 


cartridge programs 


(R0M):54KB 


Display 


Diskette Drive 


40- and ao-column 


Double-sided. 


Resolulion: 


double densHy 


4-color; frtOh X 200v 


Capacity 360 KB 


le-cdor: 320h x 200v 


Processar 


El pand ability 


16-b.t8Q8e 


Open architecture 


Keyboard 


Option 12aKB 


Typewritef-style 
Detactied; cordless 


Memory EKpansion 
Aiiactiment(s) 
13 ports for add-ons. 




including boilt-in 


1-year limited warranty 


serial interface 



Even if you don't know 
exactly ivhat aU these facts 
mean, you can still use 
them to compare PC/V to 
other computers. 

IBM Personal Computer, because 
it has the same microprocessing 
chip (the brains of a computer) 
inside it. That means that a PCjr 
and a PC with the same amount 
of memory can run nearly all the 
same software. And that's im- 
portant, because it seems like 




Sometimes it's easy to for- 
get, but there's more to life 
than just computing. 

more people are writing more 
programs for the PC than for 
any other computer around. 

I like to think that I'm a reg- 
ular, all-around kind of guy with 
lots of different interests. I'm tell- 
ing you this because I don't want 
you to get the idea that 1 just sit 
at my computer all day. The 
way I see it. a computer is just a 
thing to help you get stuff done. 

And since my PCjr helps me 
get stuff done, it seems like I've 
had lots more free time since I 
got it. And Td say Jill's had more 
free time since she's been using 
it. So wouldn't you think the two 
of us would have time to go to 
the movies together once in a 
while or something? Well, it's 
like I said before. Not quite at 
the "girlfriend" stage yet. 




.■a ^^^'' 



BMimiiii 



To see the IBM PC;t; just call 1-800-lBM-PCJR for a store near you. In Alaska or Hawaii. 1.800-4890^ 




MAGAZINE'S 



FIRST OFFICIAL ACTION /STRATEGY COMPUTER GAME 



FREE Subscriptions to MAD to the first 1000 purchasers of 
SPY VS. SPY to send in completed warranty card. 



'(E 



18 East 41st Street, New York, New York 10017 • 212-532-46S6 




AVAILABLE ON DISK FOR COMMODORE 64^^, 
APPLE® n SERIES, AND ATARI® HOME COMPUTERS. 



■n .»fii»t..n .ich NAARNER SOFTWARE, INC. 



Mad Magazine is a reglslcfed tradeinarti of E C Publteaions. Inc. and is usoO by permission: Spy vs Spy iS based upon a prooerty of EC Pubtii:ations. Ine ana Is used by perrrission Apple Alarl 
Comniodoffl are fe^isieredlrademarks of Apple Corrofalion, Inc .Atari. Inc., and ComrTiodoreEleclronics Lid. Warner Software. Ine is o a Warner Communications Companv 

Si 19B4 First Star Software, (no. All Rigtits Reserved. Printed in the U.SA 




JANUARY/ FEBRUARY 1985 




VOLUME 2. NUMBER 4 



FEAT II Pf f= s 



GREATS AND GUTCHES : 
THE ENTER AWARDS, 1984 

ENTER'S readers, advisors, and 
staff honor the year's best in 
hardware, software, events, and 
innovations. Plus, a glimpse at 
Glitches — our choices for the year's 
most dubious computer achievements. 



ROCK VIDEO '84 

Computers were behind-the-scenes stars of some of 1984's 
hottest rock videos. A close-up look at high-tech hits by Cyndi 
Lauper, The Cars, and other top bands. 




18 



THE INCREDIBLE FLYING CAMERA 50 

Skycam, a new computerized camera that can "fly," will give you 
a whole new look at your favorite sports. Plus a story showing 
how today's TV sports coverage uses microchip technology to 
compete for your attention. 



SOFTWARE ROUND-UP: S.AJs 

A kids'-eye-view of software that helps you prepare for the 
S.A.T.'s and other standardized tests. 



54 



A KATIE PARKER CAPER 

Can Katie escape from the thieves' hideout? Can a computer 
help her unravel the crooks' secret and nab them? Find out in 
this conclusion to "The Case of the Crystal Cat." 



58 




DE^^ ART ME NTS 


BffS: A byte of news briefs. 


8 


NEWSBEAT: Hardware & 
software news. 


10 


SHOWBEAT: High-tech 
entertainment info. 


12 


CONNECTIONS: Help for the 
"Disappearing Computer' user. 


14 


PACESETTERS: Real whiz kids. 


16 


USER VIEWS: Computer game 
reviews. 


42 


SOFTWARE SCANNER: 

Educational software reviews, 


48 


PENCIL CRUNCHERS: Maze. 

Pixel puzzle. 


37 
57 


RANDOM ACCESS: Kid's column. 


56 


PROGRAMMING 




ENTER CENTER: 25 

A new hands-on, pull-out 
programming section. Includes 
BASIC Training programs for 
nine computers. Ask Enter, Pencil 
Crunchers, Feedback and more. 

Cover: See credits, pages 22-24. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



CONNECT 

THE MAZE BECKONS.THE FLAMES 
THREATEN. MASTER YOUR LOGIC ANC 
INTUITION. AND ALL PATHS WILL CONNECT 
IN A FLASH OF REVELATION. 




Designed by Matthevv .Hubbard. 



I 



.■JtfSt.'-.l .-lt 




LIFT-OFF 



YOU BEGIN AN UNPRECEDENTED SPACE 
FLIGHT SIMULATION. CALCULATE THRUST 
TRAJECTORY PITCH AND YAW. 

THE CHALLENGE IS YOURS.TAKE IT 



.WttSBUniE 




Designed by Steve Kitchen. 



AVAIL^BLE FOR MAJOR HOME COMPLn"ER SYSTEMS: 



ATAR I, JMO ' AND 5200 ■■ ARE TRADEMARKS OF ATAKI rNC. COlECOVfilON ' AND ADAM " ARE TRADEMARKS OF COLECO INDUSTRIES. INC. COMMODORE 64' IS A TRADEMARK Of COMMOIDORE 
ELECTRONICS.LTD.APPlEiriS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK Of APPIE COMPUTER. •: 1984. ACT1VISION. INC. I 



x.»:" 



RESCUE. 



TRAPPED MINERS. BLOCKED SHAFTS 
l^4FESTED WITH VILE CREATURES YOUR AIR 
RUNS LOW,.. YOU HESITATE... BUT THEIR 
FATE IS IN YOUR HANDS. 



'.Iv-f:;^ 






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•:^&>^>iW,^gi 



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#*^/- A- 



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Designed by Jon Van Ryzin. 




SOLD 



'fSK?2 



~ ""' CAUGHTON A WEB OF INFINITE BEAMS 
INSTANT REFLEXES ARE YOUR ONLY HOPE. 
YET THE HURTUNG LASERS BLIND YOU. 

. THISISNOJOYRIDE. • • 



-r-T — '. ..--^-.^r^^ y 



:-:, ■ '-^'■'K ■'■f>'..'-\- ^^- f^'l"': :- ^ 



■ittlSi/H 


?**_f |jt\|| ■ •; 




^KMiVll 


i^^^l^sB 






Designed by Dave Rolfe. 





COMMODORE 64, ATARI, ADAM AND APPLE II. 

ALSO AVAILABLE FOR MAJOR GAME SYSTEMS: ATARI 2600. ATARI 5200 AND COLECOVISION 



-mBm^^M 



<1<M- 



-t>c>c> 



NSIDE TORY 



AWARDS & DISAPPEARANCES 

M ■ tneteen eighty four may have been George Orwell's 
Jl M year, but it was also the best (and worst) of times. What 

■ ■■ the dickens are we saying? Simply that some things that 

■ V happened in 1984 showed the world of computers at its 
best. ..and some were silly, wasteful and downright dumb. In 
"Greats and Glitches: The ENTER Awards, 1984," we make note 
of both. 

Though we had a lot of fun choosing them, these awards 
weren't given lightly. ENTER took more than 50 nominations from 
our contributing editors, advisors and 10-member youth advisor 
board. We also tabulated nominations from more than 1000 
readers who answered our October "Input" poll. After we found 
the most popular nominations, the ENTER staff voted on the 
finalists. The whole process took more than a month. 

Last year wasn't all highs and lows. There were also some 
disappearances. A number of computer companies went out of 
business, or discontinued their home computer lines. But the 
users of those computers didn't disappear. As ENTER staffer 
Jessica Wolfe discovered, Timex/Sinclair, Texas Instrument, 
Mattel Aquarius and other computer owners have banded 
together and are still computing away. Her informative piece in 
"Connections" is must reading for anyone with one of these 
endangered computers. 

ENTER isn't just living in the past. This issue also features the 
first appearance of a new department. ENTER CENTER brings 
together all of our hands-on stuff — programming, BASIC Plus 
tips, Ask ENTER, pencil crunchers, and more. We think you'll find 
it handy to pull out and place by your computer As the year goes 
by, you can save all of our programs. When 1985's over, you can 
combine them into into one master programming book. 

After all, saving your programs is a far, far better thing to do. 



sA.-^ 




ra Woifman 
Editor 




VOL 2. NO <.,*M,;c- 



■S t 19S5 



Publislier Nina B. Unh 

Edilar ira Wolfnian 

An Director ^^UeiHWa 

Sertoffrfitof Jim Lewis 

Manaslng Eilllor Auia Mrrero 

Ticlmltal CillUirKcieiil Cheval 

Assoclile Cillors Fatncia Setry. Susan Jariell 

^sjistanfHitof Elizabeth Kettich 

Assoclale Ail OimitorJoan Endres 

CtmtrilHJltnQ [Mors Gtris Ceil. Bernie BeKovai, 
Fia; D Ignaiio, Mite Edeltiafl. David Bcpnell, 
Mark Sullm-Smilh. PIiil Ws*ell 

Hfeil Cotif Eillot Susan Meyers 

Utiorlil Consultasls Mrew Gulelie Dinid E Coin 

niSEAKCH 

Ruureli DirtctoriPubHattoia (star Sctimeger, Ph D 

RsturcAer Andre HenriijuH 

Busimss 

Bmisttt Mniaii$r John G- Colson 

CIruilttiaii Direaor Lynn Russolilto 

Falllllmenl Manager Lucille Fnedrran 

PrDmBllim Manager E' mbelh UiJ4aniara 

Froiecllan Director Cailos N. Crosbie 

AtiiittM l^oduclloii Manager KaiHy \M 

Aovimima sales 

AiierUsinq Director Myies Grossman 
Adtertisiitg Reiirestiilallvt Jsne Abram 
AHverlisiag Coerdlaalor Jayne Pofraao 

ADVISORS 

PresHenlllnteracllve Sciences, Inc. Joan Targ 

AultiorlUucator Daniel H. Wall, PhD 

YoiitH Aili/l$ort Er c BsbiwI. ElUabClh Disney, Cynlhta Elias, 

Belh Griese, Suiama Henshon, Dan Uiamon. Philip Millirood, 

Scott Kose. Beia Selenily. Greg Trautnwi 

CHILDWIIS TCUVISION WOliKSHOf 

President Joan Gara Coorey 

Eieeutin Vice President Dnii ^B Bntl 

PresidenliCTW Profliicts Sroug Wilaw F Wialey 

Vice President and General Counsel ChrSoptiet W Congalloi 

Vice PresidenUEieciitivs Producer Dwd Conndl 

Vice PresidentfFmnce enif Administration C Sue Custiman 

Vice PrtsidentlCommiinity Education Services Evelyn p Qavis 

Vice PresldentlPMic AHairs Robert A Hatch 

Vice PresidtRtlProdnctien Allie j Hysiop 

Vice PresldenllPerlodicals Group Nina B. Link 

Vice PresldenVComf liter Sattwarc Brotip flob«/l Madcll 

Vice PresidenllResearcli Keith MislKe. Ptt D. 

Vice President! Senior Research Fellow EcwardL Palmer PhD 



ADVERTISma SALES OFFICE 

Myles Grossman 
Advertising Director 

ENTER Mapjine 

1 Lncoin Piaa 

New York. NY 10023 

(212) 595-3456 



AoDlied tcr membership. Audit Bureau ol Circuiations 



ENTIR it I piibllc«tlan tfi llt« Clifldrf n'l TelntslDii W«lrahl}p. One Lincoln 
Pint. New rcirt. Heiw York 10023: pubiiitit j maithiy. eiccpt rorAjguit ind 
Ftbruiry VolLme ? Number 4. Jamiaiyfebiuary ~ I9&5CnildrErs 
letBiiitiQn Warkihop, Ail liglits rESErved. No corlErtt may be repiinlDII 
wittiaul [lErmlulan ot t^E Cbildrei's Television WcrtLi^Gp. EKTfR ii a 
trademark al IKe ChildrEn t Televiaion tMorlohDia. A>pli»tlon id mail a! 
tECDid ciattpaslaaE raiE Is pending it Hew York, NY. and aladdiliisttil 
milling unit EI Piinled In lliE tl S-A- Ediloriat ntncei, t LincoinPlaTi, New 
Ygrl. H Y ISIia. POSTMASTER: Send addrau chingei Id: ENTER. One Olili 
Orivi, PO Bdj 2M6. Biulder, CO BD322 linclude label rrom conr). 
Sibicilpiloiu: 1 year: U.S.A. S14.9S, Canada and alliii counlr^fs iU,ii- 



ENTER 



JANUARY/ FEBRUARY 1985 



LOST. 



ENDLESS CAVERNS. ATTACKING BEASTS. FINDTHE D[AMOND,THE GOLD. MAYBE. 



' Ge: the number one software entertainment 
liile of the year for your Commodons 64,'Mron'.' 
Apple ir and IBM' PQr' computer systems. 
Also available for major game systems. 
Designed by David Crane 






mmsam 






AdiVisioK, 





ROM AND ROLL 



Some say computers can't hold 
a drumstick to rock music, but 
KGON 92 FM doesn't agree. 

Micros and rock share a home 
at this Portland, Oregon, radio 
station, KGON has set up 
"Rockflles," a database on a 
TRS-80 color computer, so that 
computer users can tap into the 
latest rock news. 

This electronic bulletin board 
gives up to 15 minutes worth of 
rock and roll Information to each 
caller Using a computer hooked 
to a modem, you can find out 
what albums are hot and who's 
climbing the KGON charts. 

"The real appeal of the system 
Is Its library of rock facts and 
figures," says "Rockflles" us.er 
Kirk Rasco. There are also 
concert calendars, album 
reviews, and reports on top- 
selling video games and VCR 
cassettes. Users can even 
exchange opinions about the 
hottest rock by leaving messages 



on the "Rockflles" electronic 
bulletin board. 

Who says ROM and RAM and 
Rock and Roll don't mix? 



FLEAS' FOE 



Your dog's got fleas? You've 
tried everything from flea baths to 
flea collars, and that poor pooch 
is still itching like there's no 
tomorrow? Well, the cure may be 
in sight..,. or in sound. Ultrasonic 
sound, that Is. 

Biotechnology, Inc. of Miami, 
Florida, has invented an elec- 
tronic flea collar. This collar 
doesn't cook the fleas; it uses 
ultrasonic sound waves to get rid 
of them. The collar comes with a 
small speaker attachment that 
sends out ultrasound pulses. The 
folks at Biotechnology say this 
sounds like a jackhammer to the 
fleas, but It won't bother the dog. 




Pestering the pests, claims the 
company, will make fleas flee. 

■ ■ ■ 

A BETTER IDEA? 




When you shop for a new car, 
remember to kick the tires and 
touch the computer screen. 

The Ford Motor Company Is in- 
stalling touch-screen computers 
In dealer showrooms. The com- 
puters are programmed to answer 
questions about cars, options and 
accessories. Ford hopes to set up 
2,000 "Selection Center" com- 
puters by 1986, So far, customer 
reaction seems positive. "Many 
younger people respond more 
favorably to a computer than they 
do to a salesman," says Ford rep- 
resentative Thomas Wagner "The 
computer has more credibility." 

Ford promises that computers 
will not replace sales people, 
however After all, what would 
happen If car buyers got so con- 
fused they touched the tires and 
kicked the screen? Crash! Q 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



"The machine works in a trouble-free manner, and is reiilly a pleasure to use." 

Robert J. Burdett— Oak Park, Illinois 

'1 was so pleased with the ADAM that I took it to school and gave a presentation to the 
entire school body. When 1 was finished many of my peers were raving over the ADAM." 

Michael Dijulio— Chicago, Illinois 

"You have an excellent machine for the home user. Smart LOGO and Smart Filer are 
excellent. . .Smart Keys make it very easy to use the software, even before you read the 
instructions completely." Wayne Motel — Dyer, Indiana 



"Your keyboard is better than the Apple.*" 



Donald Prohaska— San Diego, California 



'1 find the word processor and the basic programming language to be very user friendly." 

Gordon R. Franke— Kirksville, Missouri 

'1 am more than pleased with the operation of the machine, and not having any experience 
with computers, I am happy that finally someone has produced a machine not only at a 
reasonable cost, but one that you can nearly sit down and start using without any training period." 

Frederick A. Tripodi— New York, New York 



THE 

CUSTOMER IS 
ALWAYS r:, 

RIGHT 



[ 




AEIAM 

Family Computer System. 



o 1984 Coleco Industries Inc. TV nol included "Apple is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. 



EDITED BY RICHARD C H £ VAT 



GAME- 



BUSTERS 




"We came. We saw. We made a qimeV'—Ghostbusters creator David Crane. 



/f there's something. strange in 
the neighborhood, who you 
gonna call? 

David Crane! He ain't afraid of 
no ghosts! 

And he ain't afraid of six week 
deadlines, either. Six weeks, you 
see, is how long Crane and a 
team of Activision programmers, 
graphic artists and other design- 
ers had to create Ghostbusters — 
the new computer game based 
on (you guessed it) last summer's 
mega-hit movie. 

A rush job? No way, claims 
Crane, who is best known as 
creator of two video game mega- 
hits. Pitfall and Pitfall II: Lost Cav- 
erns. "It's as good a game as I 
could do if I took 10 years to do it," 
he says. 



Crane is the brain behind the 
game. But, he admits, the other 
folks at Activision helped a lot. "I 
did all the programming on 
Ghostbusters," he explains. "But I 
also worked as what we call 'the 
director.'" Crane directed a Ghost- 
busters design team who helped 
with details like the game's music 
and the title screen. The team 
included a graphic artist, pro- 
gramming assistant Mark Bellin, 
"and people at Activision who I'd 
call and ask to help out with one- 
week projects." 

But even with all the help, it was 
tough to pull off this game- 
making feat. "A combination of 
things made it possible," says 
Crane. The team effort was impor- 
tant. So was the fact that David 



had been working for two months 
on a "game without a theme" 
when Activision brass asked if 
he'd like to design the Ghost- 
busters game. 

"I'd been programming this 
game idea for a while. I had some 
good screens— like a car driving 
around on city streets," recalls 
Crane. "But [the idea] wasn't 
going anywhere because the 
game had no theme." Combining 
this preliminary programming 
work with the hit movie's theme 
was "serendipity," according to 
Crane. "Without that, we couldn't 
have done it." 

One other bit of luck helped 
Crane turn Ghostbusters into a 
game — the movie itself 

"I think Ghostbusters [the 
movie] translates very easily into a 
game format," he says. The movie 
"has everything a good game 
has — action, adventure. ..and it's 
funny." By the time the game was 
done, Crane had seen the movie 
three times all the way through, 
and watched certain action 
scenes "at least a dozen times 
each." 

David Crane crammed a lot of 
viewing, programming, directing, 
and designing into the six weeks 
it took to create the Ghostbusters 
game. But it was very important 
for him to finish in six weeks. Why? 

On the seventh week, you see, 
David Crane got married. 

TRUE BASIC IS NO LIE: Coming 
soon — from the people who 
brought you BASIC — a new, 
improved programming language 
called True BASIC. And that's the 
truth! 



10 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



True BASIC is a new version 
of the most popular home com- 
puter language. "So much has 
changed in the 20 years since 
the first BASIC was written at 
Dartmouth," says Stew Chapin, 
director of marketing for True 
BASIC. "We can do a lot more now 
that we don't have to squeeze 
everything into the 4K we had on 
the first micros." 

One of the exciting features of 
True BASIC is that it "will look the 
same on every computer it runs 
on," promises Chapin. "Your 
graphics program won't have to 
be rewritten every time you move 
to a new computer." 

That's not all. This language 
uses a new approach to 
programming that has developed 
in the last 10 years — structured 
programming. This means that 
many of True BASIC'S features are 
designed to help you write 
simpler, easy-to-understand 
programs. 

For example, the old FOR NEXT 
loop in BASIC has been replaced 
with several new ways of looping. 
They are designed to give you 
greater control over when and 
how to end the loop. 

True BASIC comes as a 
software package and will require 
128K to run. It needs that room to 
include a screen and text editor 
(programs that allow you to 
change your text or program once 
it's typed in). It will also include a 
new way of compiling your BASIC 
program. Compiling is the 
process that turns a BASIC 
program into the binary code 
computers understand. 

"We've made it so much easier 
to program graphics," says 
Chapin. "Our new PICTURE 
command will be very familiar to 
Logo users. It allows you to define 
a picture, then use it as a kind of 




Data General's full-screen portable. 



subroutine. You can rotate it, 

shrink it, enlarge it and redraw it 
as many times as you wish." 

True BASIC software is being 
published by Addison-Wesley in 
early 1985. The first versions, on 
disk for the IBM PC and the 
Macintosh, should sell for less 
than $200. Versions for other 
home computers will follow. 

HEYMOE! GIMME A QUARTER!: 

Moe, Larry and Curly— those 
ever-popuiar Three Stooges of 
movie and TV fame — are taking 
their shenanigans into arcades 
across the U.S. Following success 
with Stooges' posters, T-shirts, 
greeting cards, comic books, and 
a hit record ("The Curly Shuffle"), 
the slapstick team has an arcade 
hit. Mylstar Electronics' Three 
Stooges arcade game has the 
Stooges trying to rescue Nora, 
Dora, and Cora from the mad 
doctor I. M. Acad, Moe, Larry and 
Curly are controlled with three 
joysticks, so they can defend 
themselves in typical Stooges 
style — by throwing pies. These 
zanies seem to have "slip-on-a- 
banana-peel" appeal — even 
when you have to pay. 

OPEN THE DISK DRIVE DOOR, HAL 

The calendar may say 1985, but 
the year on the movie and video 



screens is 2010. Coleco plans to 
introduce two games based on 
the holiday sci-fi movie, 20W. The 
games, 2010 Strategy and 2010 
Action, will be available for the 
Adam and ColecoVision systems. 

POWERFUL PORTABLE: Data 
General has made a big advance 
in the portable computer field. Its 
Data General/One portable is an 
IBM-compatible that comes with 
two built-in disk drives. But the 
real news is its tilt-up, full-size. 80- 
column by 25-line screen. The 
Data General/One weighs less 
than 11 pounds. The price tag, 
however, is hefty— $2,895. 

MULTI-PURPOSE MONITORS: 

Several manufacturers have 
recently come out with televisions 
that can double as high-quaiity 
color computer monitors. Sears 
13-inch Model 4084 sells for $350, 
The Pioneer SD-25, which costs 
$1200, features a 25-inch screen 
and needs add-on modules to be 
used as a television or RGB 
monitor This Pioneer set even has 
an optional accessory that lets 
you replace the voice of your 
favorite rock video star with your 
own crooning. 

JOYSTICKS TO THE WORLD: Want 
arcade-quality game playing at 
home? Two new joysticks promise 
to give you just that. Suncom's 
TAC-3 features an extra fire button 
on the top of the stick. It costs 
$14.95. Video Peripherals, Inc., 
offers the HS 15, a joystick they 
claim to be the product of 
"extensive study in the fields 
of electronics and human 
physiology." The HS 15, which 
sells for $39.95, features a wide, 
weighted base, two fire buttons 
and an extra-thick handle. That's 
state-of-the-art zapping. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



11 



EDITED BY PATRICIA BERRY 



DINOSAURS GO DIGITAL 




Going somewhere? Diirosaitr roars could make Baby a howling success. 



Dubbing a dinosaur movie is 
no simple matter. You can't 
just have someone standing 
in tine background yelling "Hu- 
rew! Hu-rew!" every time the bron- 
tosaurus has a line- 
So what do you do? Well, first 
you call in a few whales, an ele- 
phant or two, some camels and 
hyenas. Then you call in Mark 
Mangini — and make sure he 
brings his computer If he for- 
gets.. .well, then you have a real 
zoo on your hands! 

The producers of Baby, a new 
Disney film, made sure that Mark 
brought his computer to work on 
their movie. Baby, due out next 
month, is about an American sci- 
entist's discovery of a modern-day 
family of dinosaurs living in the 
African jungle. It stars William Katt 
(of TV's Great American Hero) and 



Sean Young (Chani in Dune). 
Baby is filled with the sounds of 
dinosaurs — courtesy of Mark 
Mangini, his partner, George 
Budd, and their sound effects 
company Thundertracks. 

Thundertracks' dubbing has 
been heard in Raiders of the Lost 
Ark, Poltergeist, and 2070. Mark 
also worked on the sound effects 
in Gremlins, creating the voices of 
Gizmo and other gremlins from 
sounds made by his own baby 
son. 

Baby's dino dialogue began 
with recordings of real animals — 
more than 20 of them, including 
bobcats, hyenas and dogs. Even 
before the animals were recorded, 
however, Mark's computer — an 
Alpha Micro muiti-user system — 
went to work. 

First, "we went through the 



script, logging on the computer 
all the situations that required di- 
nosaur sounds," Mark explains. 
"Then the computer organized 
that information into, say, how 
many times we needed the dino- 
saur to make angry, growling 
sounds, and so on." 

Once Mark had the log of all the 
sounds he needed, it was time to 
go on a sound safari. He used a 
highly sensitive microphone to 
record the sounds of elephants, 
hyenas and other animals. The 
results were then entered into the 
computer: "We're a small compa- 
ny but we have hundreds of 
thousands of sounds in our library 
and listed on our computer." 

With the library of real animal 
sounds, Mark began creating the 
"voice" of the dinosaur. But how 
do you create this sound when 
no human has ever heard a 
dinosaur? 

"I'm still not sure we know," 
Mark admits. "I have a vague idea 
of what works dramatically — what 
dinosaurs might really have 
sounded like. But I've heard that 
they might not have made any 
sound af a//.. .What we concen- 
trate on is making the most 
interesting sounds." he says. "We 
created a sad sound, for instance, 
without even knowing if a real di- 
nosaur could express sorrow." 

Mark had to count on experi- 
ence to carry him through this 
creative sound-making process. 
To make an adult dinosaur sound, 
he and his recording assistant 
Doug Hemphill began with ele- 
phant noises. Elephants make 
extremely loud sounds, and they 
have a wide vocal range, says 



12 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ssm. 



Mark. For the baby brontosaurus 
sound, Mark started with a camel 
sound. Of course, he didn't stop 
with these single sounds. He 
electronically strung together a 
number of sounds to get just the 
right effect. 

The computer is used for much 
of this soundmixing. One se- 
quence may require a hundred 
different sounds that need to be 
mixed onto one tape, Mark sits at 
a computerized mixing console, 
deciding how to combine the 100 
tracks. The computer records 
every move he's made. That way, 
changes can be made later in the 
sound editing process. 

There were a number of unique 
sounds created for this Baby. The 
sound of the mother dinosaur 
roaring, for example, is actually 
made up of a sequence of 
elephant and snow leopard 
sounds. But Mark's biggest dis- 
covery — in more ways than one — 
was the sound of whales. "It turns 
out whales have an incredible 
range of sounds from low groans 
to super high notes/' he says. 
"They growl, laugh, roar, squeak. 
They can even make two sounds 
at one time; a high-pitched 
squeak and a low groan all at 
once." Mark adds that the com- 
bination of whale and elephant 
sounds in the voices of the adult 
dinos "wili rumble the theater" 

Making the theater rumble with 
help from a computer is rewarding 
for Mark. But his very favorite part 
of the job is being out in the field 
recording animals. This can be a 
real adventure. Mark recalls cam- 
els who spit at him, and the 
elephant who almost pinned him 
to a wall. 

Unlike computers, five-ton ani- 
mals aren't known for being user- 
friendly. 

MUSICAL STAIRS: What's more fun 




Gompulers help slairs "sound" off. 



than musical chairs? Musical 
stairs, of course! "Soundstair" is 
just that — a computerized, travell- 
ing exhibition that's a kind of 
musical chairs on stairs. 

"Soundstair" was created by 
Chris Janney, a former MIT 
(Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology) artist. To make stair- 
ways sing, Janney hooks up a 
computer, a synthesizer, and a set 
of photoelectric cells or electronic 
eyes (like the kind used for alarm 
systems or automatic doors). 

Anytime anyone steps on a 
"Soundstair" stair, a beam of light 
is broken. That triggers the 
synthesizer to play a note, ex- 
plains Janney. 

In a way "Soundstair" was Chris 
Janney 's introduction to com- 
puters. "I don't have an extensive 
computer background," he ad- 
mits. "I don't even have an 
extensive electronics back- 
ground." 

So when it came time to build 
the largely electronic, computer- 
based system, Janney made use 
of the people around him. "In a 
place like MIT — with its computer 
programmers, engineers and sci- 
entists—anything can be built." 

Last October, Janney set up 



"Soundstair" in front of New York 
City Hall, and Mayor Ed Koch 
danced a musical jig on the spot. 
Janney has also taken "Sound- 
stair" to the Spanish Steps in 
Rome, Italy and to Boston's Fan- 
euil Hall Marketplace. In Boston, 
he convinced a mounted police 
officer to coax his horse up the 
stairs. Hooves and high notes 
combined into a kind of high-tech 
tune, 

Chris claims that kids are by far 
the biggest fans of "Soundstair" 
Adults stand around "trying to un- 
derstand the thing," Chris 
recounts. "And then these kids 
come whipping right through, and 
they get it, right away" 

Sounds like those kids are the 
winners of this musical chairs. . .er, 
stairs,.. competition. S 



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JANUARY/FEBRUAflY 1985 



ENTER 



13 



ONNECTIONS 



EDITED BY SUSAN J A R R E L L 



DISAPPEARING COMPUTERS: 



A PROGRESS REPORT 



"The main thing is not to get dis- 
couraged. . . The challenge to us, 
as owners of 'gone- but-not-forgot- 
ten' computers, is to survive." 

Ronald Smith 
Worth, IL 

Over the past few months, EN- 
TER has tried to keep you up-to- 
date on new devefopments re- 
garding so-called "disappearing 
computers" — including Timex/ 
Sinclair, Tl 99/4A, Osborne, 
Mattel Aquarius and others. In our 
June issue, we asked those of you 
who own these computers to let 
us know how you've been making 
out. Judging by your letters (and 
most of them were very encourag- 
ing), one thing is certain: there are 
places to go for support, whether 
you want software, literature, or 
just a littie help from time to time. 

With your help, we managed to 
find a few new sources. We also 
discovered a couple of interesting 
developments in the world of 
"here-today, gone-tomorrow" 
computing. We hope these tips 
will help. We also hope you con- 
tinue to let us know how you're 
coping. 



-^( 

The Best Resource: 
Users Groups 



One of the best things any com- 
puter user can do is join a local 
users group. These groups are 
great sources of information. 



Many of them have software librar- 
ies which contain free, or nearly 
free public domain software, and 
many low-cost game and utility 
programs. (Tl owners, for exam- 
ple, can get over 400 public 
domain programs through users 
groups.) If you can't find a local 
users group, contact one in an- 
other area and ask them for help 
in starting your own. 



Timex /Sinclair 



"Just because Timex has ceased 
marketing the 1000, 1500 and 
2068 doesn't mean that we're 
going to quit using ours... If we 
band together and pool our re- 
sources, the future can look bright 
and promising . " S/7/ Ferreb ee 
T/S Support Group 
Paden City, WV 

There are many print resources 



available for Timex/Sinclair 
owners. Syntax is a useful 12- 
page monthly newsletter 
Subscribers can get back issues 
of out-of-print T/S publications 
from Syntax. The publishers also 
offer substantial discounts on pre- 
packaged software. For $2, you 
can get a list of vendors who are 
still carrying T/S software. If you 
send them a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope. Syntax will 
also put you in touch with one of 
the 181 T/S users groups in the 
U.S. For more information, write: 
Syntax, Boulton Road, Harvard, 
MA 01451-0667. 

SYNC magazine is no longer 
being published. A new maga- 
zine, T/S Horizons, will help fill the 
gap. For subscription information, 
write to: T/S Horizons, 2002 Sum- 
mit St., Portsmouth, OH. 45662 

SOFTWARE: Quicksilva Inc. has 
quite a few T/S 2068 action 
games available through mail 
order Prices range from $19.95 to 
$24.95. For a price and title list 
which includes Smuggler's Cove 
and Timegate, write to: Quick- 
silva, Inc., 426 West Nakoma. San 




14 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 19B5 



Antonio, TX 78216. 

The Timex Company no longer 
has a toll-free customer service 
number, If you have questions 
about service, you have to pay for 
the long-distance call. You can 
reach them by calling 
203-573-4883. 

A Timex/Sinclair Users Con- 
ference is in the process of being 
organized for sometime in early 
1985. Write to: T/S Support Group, 
115 North 7th Ave., Paden City 
WV 26159 for updates and more 
information. 



Texas Instruments 



Even though Texas Instruments 
pulled the rug out from under 
ow/ners of the T I 99/4A, the com- 
pany is still very much in 
business. So, if you want to find a 
dealer who might have T I soft- 
ware left, you can contact the 
company directly For those of you 
who don't have Tl's hotline 
number, it's 1-800-TI-CARES. 

As ENTER reported previously 
Triton Products bought Tl's re- 
maining stock of software and 
peripherals. Triton has some T I 
software available, but the supply 
is limited, Write for a catalogue: 
Triton, RO. Box 8123, San Fran- 




cisco, CA 94128. 

The national network of Tl users 
groups are your best bet if you're 
looking for software. Call the Tl 
hotline and they will send you a 
free list. Chances are very good 
that there is at least one users 
group (and probably more) in your 
state. 

"/ think if all ttie owners of both 
Timex and Texas Instruments 
(computers) would just be pa- 
tient, it will work out for us." 

— Dane Stegman 
Akron, NY 



Matte! Intellivislon /Aquarius 

Mattel is no longer selling its 
computer and game player line. 
However, Intellivision owners can 
look forward to seeing some new 
software this year. A new compa- 
ny called Intellivision, promises to 
begin producing new software for 
Intellivision systems (including 
the Aquarius computer and Intel- 
livision game system). For more 
information, write to: Intellivision, 
21535 Hawthorne Blvd, Torrence, 
CA 90503. 

Mattel will continue to handle 
service warranties. The customer 
service hotline (1-800-421-2826) 





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says it will attempt to answer any 
of your questions. 

Cezar Industries in San Fran- 
cisco has taken over the 
marketing of Aquarius systems 
and software. According to the 
company Mattel has turned over 
its user lists to Cezar, who will 
keep Aquarius owners up to date 
on the company's progress. 

Cezar plans to have an Aquar- 
ius II system on the market very 
soon. The company has 
taken steps to support current 
and new owners with software and 
peripherals. For more information, 
write to; Aquarius, 451 Leahy 
Street, Redwood City CA 94062. 



Osborne 



In the down-bui-not-out depart- 
ment, Osborne computer owners 
still have a pretty good chance of 
getting software. At this writing, 
the company was still making 
some software, but what is avail- 
able is limited to business and 
utility programs. 

In the meantime, the First Os- 
borne Group (FOG) which is the 
largest Osborne user's group in 
the country, has hundreds of pub- 
lic-domain programs available. 
Write to FOG. RO, Box 3474, 
Daly City CA, 94015- 0474. 

—Jessica Wolfe 



-^« 

Send Us Your Problems And Tips 

ENTER would like to continue to 
keep you up-to-date on new re- 
sources for "disappearing.. .and 
disappeared" computers. If you 
know of any that we haven't 
mentioned, write to us at; 
Disappearing Computers, 
ENTER, 1 Lincoln Plaza, New 
York. N.Y 10023. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



15 



tlCESEmRS 

EDITED BY ELIZABETH H ET T I C H 



• •• 



TOMAS THE ADVENTURE TESTER 




Risky Business: Tomas, 15, spent his summer debugging Infocom games. 



■ Bow would you like to spend 
^w your summer adventuring 
M m through castles or hitchhik- 
ing across the galaxy? That's what 
15-year-old Tomas Bok did last 
summer — as a game tester for the 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, soft- 
ware company Infocom, 

Tomas tested Infocom's new 
games Hitchhiker's Guide to the 
Galaxy and Cutthroats, as well as 
a software sampler that includes 
the beginnings of Zork I & //, In- 
fidel an<;l Planetfall. 

"1 played adventure games 
eight hours a day five days a 
week — learning every little thing 
about them," remembers Tomas. 
"You start out by playing the 
game until you've completely 
solved it and know the plot. That's 



the easy part. After that, you start 
fooking for the bugs." 

To find bugs in these text ad- 
venture programs, Tomas had to 
play the game over and over 
again. He also typed in unusual 
commands to see how the com- 
puter software would respond. 
"For instance, if you're playing 
Zork and you type in the word 
Zork. the computer responds At 
your service.' Well, there are 
things like that buried throughout 
Infocom games, I had to check to 
make sure everything worked, 
and was spelled correctly" 

Sometimes he'd find bugs that 
needed major corrections. Hitch- 
hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, for 
instance, was just too difficult 
when Tomas first tested it. Thanks 



in part to his suggestions, game 
designer Steven Meretcky and the 
game's programmers made big 
changes before Hitchhiker v^enl 
on sale. Tomas also caught small- 
er errors, like spelling mistakes. 

It was a lucky break that got 
Tomas the job at Infocom. "My 
next-door neighbor happened to 
be dating someone who knows 
fvlark Blank — .one of Infocom's 
game designers," he says. "My 
neighbor suggested that since In- 
focom's games are played by 
kids, it would be good to have 
someone my age testing them." 

Tomas had been programming 
computers for several years and 
had played Infocom games. "But I 
never dreamed that I'd get to work 
at Infocom with these designers. 
That was a real thrill for me." 

It was also a little intimidating. "I 
was the youngest person there. 
There was no one my age to talk 
to. f felt like an outsider," he re- 
calls. Before long, that began to 
change. "Everyone was really 
kind. Soon I was playing softball 
on the company team. Sometimes 
1 even found myself playing 
games on the computer until the 
middle of the night," Tomas re- 
members. "We would even take 
Infocom games, change the 
commands and put in silty jokes." 

It wasn't all fun and games, 
though. "When people hear that 
my whole job consisted of playing 
computer adventure games, they 
always respond the same way; 
'Oh boy, real tough job, huh?' 
What they don't realize is that 
playing adventure games all day 
every day really is hard work." 

And, a real adventure, too. E 



16 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



TAKE ANY2 FOR ^95 EAOI 

when you join the Columbia Software Club and agree to buy 4 selections at regular Club prices in the next 2 years 




0040022 

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0041012 

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Rock 




THE YEAR'S 

HOTTEST HIGH-TECH 

MUSIC VIDEOS 



^ ^m usic makes you 
^^y|B dream. And in 
g g - B^ dreams, you can 
mfWf Ur do almost any- 
w^ ^ thing — soar and 
swirl and even cliange shiapes. 
In 1984, computers brought 
some of the year's top music video 
dreams to life. With help from 
computers and other high-tech 
equipment, performers soared 
and swirled and took all kinds of 
fantastic shapes. 

Throughout the year, music stars 
like The Cars, Cyndi Lauper, Herbie 

18 



Hancock and Paul Simon v\/orked 
with special effects experts and 
graphic computers like the Mirage, 
the Paintbox and the CBG 
{Character Background Gener- 
ator). The result: music videos with 
a high-tech difference. To honor 
these achievements, ENTER has 
picked the Top High-Tech Music 
Videos of 1984. 

SWEET DREAMS ARE 
MADE OF THIS... 



"Using the computer helps us 
make the video into a fantasy," says 
Ric Ocasek of The Cars. Each of 
the three computers used in these 
videos had its own special way of 
creating fantasy 

• The Mirage, for instance, takes 
"any picture, reduces it to its pixels, 
and then tells the pixels where to 
go," according to Stacey Foster of 



ENTER 



the Broadway Video special effects 
company A technician uses the 
Pascal computer language to plot 
points that create a design. The 
tviirage then changes a video im- 
age into this design. That's how a 
normal-looking rock star can sud- 
denly be changed into the shape of 
a guitar 

• The Paintbox changes the 
color of anything or everything in a 
video. This system's software, 
monitor and very large graphics 
tablet (about iy2 feet by 2 feet) can 
also be used to animate video 
images. 

• The CBG's 240K memory can 
put as many as 5,000 different col- 
ors on screen at the same time. The 
CBG's graphics program can also 
shrink, tilt, rotate or zoom in on any 
video image. 

Even the most astounding com- 
puter, however, won't make a bad 
song into a great video. That's why 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 




The CARS: "You Might THINK" 



we looked for an inspired mix of 
images and music in picking our 
Top Higln-Tech Music Videos. Here 
are the '84 videos we tliink make 
the best use of computers, robots, 
and other technology to add fan- 
tasy and excitement to the music 
on the screen. 

THE CARS: "You Might Think" (Elektre 
Records). In this video, The Cars' lead 
singer Ric Ocasek turns up as 
everything from a periscope to a 
buzzing bee to the hands on an 
alarm clock. And it's all done with 
help from Paintbox. 

"We use our tools to create real- 
ity," says Alex Weil of Charlex, the 
special effects production com- 
pany that created these scenes. 

Here, for instance, is how they 
turned Ocasek into the hands on 
an alarm clock. First, a photo was 
taken of the scene — with a stand-in 
alarm clock on the bedside table. 
Then, the video was shot minus the 
alarm clock. With the photo as a 
guide, the artists at Charlex used 
Paintbox to paint a pastel-colored 
alarm clock into the scene. 
Paintbox was then used again to 
put Ocasek onto the face of the 



clock, to animate his arms, and to 
make the clock jump up and down. 
Charlex, explains Alex Weil, paid 
close attention to detail. "When the 
clock jumps, so does the shadow," 
says Weil. "If the lighting were off 
even a tiny bit, you'd notice. That's 



the special effects tip off. When the 

alarm clock jumps, the shadow re- 
sponds as it would in real life." 

The "You Might Think" video sin- 
gle isn't the only Cars' video with 
high-tech effects. The group's en- 
tire video album. Heartbeat City, is 
filled with computer-generated 
effects created by the technical ex- 
perts at Charlex. In the video 
album's opening sequence, for 
instance, some world-famous land- 
marks are transformed with the 
help of a Paintbox and a Mirage- 
like system called the ADO {Ampex 
Digital Optics). These computers 
replace the faces on Mount Rush- 
more — Washington, Jefferson, 
Lincoln and Roosevelt— with The 
Cars' faces. And they turn the 
Flatiron Building in New York into a 
giant ironing board. 

"We even got our name in," says 
Charlex's Alex Weil. The final scene 
is in front of a hotel whose com- 
puter-generated name just 
happens to be The Charlex. 




BETTE MIDLER: "BETTEMiDLER:ARTORBUST!' 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



19 




BETTER MIDLER: "Bette Midler: Art 
or Bust!" (HBO). Bette looks divine all 
through her HBO concert — thanks 
to The Paintbox. 

There's no downtime between 
Bette's songs, because almost 
every tune ends with a scene 
painted using the Paintbox. The 
painted scene dissolves into the 
real-life performance of the next 
song. 

To make these transitions work 
perfectly, "every fifth frame was 
painted [with Paintbox] and edited 
together," says Stacey Foster of 
Broadway Video. That's how Bette 
can end a song wearing one outfit, 
and begin the following song 
dressed in something different. 

What does the Divine Miss M 
think of all this? 

"They want me to operate a com- 




Paul Simon : "Rene and Georgette Magritte 
With Their Dog After the War" 



puter," says Bette. "I can't even 
plug in my toaster!" 

HERBIE HANCOCK: "Rockir (Columbia 
Records). "Rockit," which features 




Herbie Hancock: "Rockit" 



dancing robot legs and spacey 
sounds, may look incredibly high- 
tech. But looks are deceiving, The 
only computer used in this music 
video was the Apple lie, which 
controlled a Rhodes Chroma key- 
board synthesizer Still, this video's 
playful, high-tech touches give it a 
spot among our music video picks. 

As this video begins, you enter a 
normal-looking house and are sud- 
denly surrounded by all kinds of 
robots. They look sensational — but 
these aren't real mechanical robots. 
English designer Jim Whiting calls 
them Unnatural Bodies, and that's 
just what they are. These human- 
looking "beings" were operated 
manually off-camera. 

The Unnatural Bodies even have 
names: '\/eronica the Housewife, 
The Business Man, The Baby and 
The Pervy Men (a crazy chorus line 
of headless male mannequins sus- 
pended in mid-air,) 

"We needed something 
unusual," says Herbie's associate 
record producer Tony Meilandt. 
"There aren't life-size, human-like 
robots on the market. Creatively 
these were just what we wanted. " 



20 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



PAUL SIMON: "Rene and Georgette 
Magritte Witti Their Dog After the 
War" (Warner Brothers Records) . Rene 
Magritte was an artist wtio created 
remarkable pictures with paint on a 
canvas. In Paul Simon's musical 
tribute to ttiis artist, the Mirage was 
used to recreate some great 
Magritte paintings on a screen. 

In the beginning of the song, for 
example, a picture of Simon takes 
the shape of a keyhole that seems 
to float in the air. This image stood 
still in Magritte's work. It can move 
here with help from the Mirage . 

In the video's very last scene, a 
recreated Magritte painting is 
changed into brilliant, bursting fire- 
works. Broadway Video tech expert 
Stacey Foster explains that this was 
done by using the Mirage to break 
the picture into individual pixels 
"verrrry slowly." 

CYNDI LAUPER: "Girls Just Want To 
Have Fun" (Portrait/ Epic Hecords). This 
video bounds along with Cyndi's 
''so unusual" brand of fun, but with- 
out many special effects— until the 




Cyndi Lauper: "GirlsJust Want To HaveFun" 



very end. That's when director Ken 
Walz uses the Mirage to float Cyndi 
and friends away in a giant bubble. 

Once the video was shot, pro- 
grammers wrote code that created 
the shape of the bubble. The Mi- 
rage then put Cyndi's video image 
together with the programmed 
bubble shape. When Cyndi and 




o 

Tt 

o 

-< 
z 
o 



Lou Reed : "Legendary Hearts- 



company drifted off above the 
streets of New York, says Walz, it 
marked the first time the Mirage 
was ever used in a music video. 

LOU REED: "Legendary Hearts" (RCA 
Records). As Lou sings his heart out 
on this tune, he's suddenly sur- 
rounded by video hearts. The 
hearts weren't there when he 
started. They were added with a 
■CBG after the performance . 

Judy Zahn of Editel, another 
video production company, was 
given an early version of Lou's 
video and told where to put in the 
hearts. She created these and 
other fanciful images on the CBG. 
When the final video was ready, 
the CBG hearts were added in. 

All through 1984, computers 
changed the shape of music video 
images. At the same time, music 
videos were returning the favor. 
These high-tech videos are helping 
change the image of computers, 
according to rock photographer/ 
video maker Lynn Goldsmith: 

"In the past, people have been 
turned off by the idea of special 
effects. Now they see how the com- 
puter can help enhance songs, tell 
a story and entertain." H 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



21 



Grea ts & 

Glitches 



THE ENTER AWARDS FOR 1984 



r'he Oscars, the Emmys, the Grammys and 
now.... 
The ENTER Awards, 1984. 
Some very good things happened this year in 
the field of computers and new technology At ENTER, 
we felt it was important to recognize these real 
achievements of 1984 — great hardware and software, 



exciting high-tech happenings and people. We also 
couldn't resist naming some of the year's great glit- 
ches — dubious achievements with a high-tech twist. 
Ail winners were chosen by the ENTER staff from 
nominees suggested by readers, youth advisors, ad- 
visors, and contributing editors. And now, 
without further ado: The First Annual ENTER Awards. 



A Computer That Cttanged 
The Way We Look at Computers 



going to be around for quite a 
while."— Greff Trautman, 17, Youth Adviser. 




From Hi-Res to "The A-Team' 
On a Single Screen 



THE MACINTOSH (Apple Computer Co.) 
"It's an incredible machine. It 
bridges the gap between people 
and computers because it is so 
easy to use. Yet, with its 32-bit 
microprocessor and other features, 
it offers more advanced users a 
great deal, too. It's a machine that's 



THE RGB MONITOR AND TV (Sears and 
ott}er manufacturers). "This high-resolu- 
tion color monitor is also a regular 
TV set. It costs half of what other 
RGBs cost. When you get done 
with your computer work on the 
excellent monitor, you just flip a 
switch and watch TV. If you're think- 
ing about buying a TV set, think 
about getting this instead." 
—Joan Targ, Advisor. 




As technology improves, prices 
should continue to come down, let- 
ting everyone have his or her own 
typesetter right at home." 
—Richard Chevat, Technical Editor 



The Prints and the Pauper 



The Ught, Fantastic! 



LOW-COST PRINTERS With new low- 
cost machines like Okidata's 
Okimate and the Centronics GLP, 
printers are much more affordable. 



GIBSON UGHT PEN (Koala Technologies). 
"A thoughtfully designed, quality 
light pen that is very easy to han- 



22 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 




Disc and Dirk Go To The Arcade 



die. It's more expensive than many 
other light pens. But if you're into 
serious computer graphics ap- 
plications, you won't be wasting the 
unique power that you're paying 
for. "—Hllde Weisert, software reviewer. 



Not Just Another Pretty Typeface 



THE PRINT SHOP (Broderbund). 
"Exceptional, it offers such a rich 
variety of different type styles and 
designs. You can use it to make 
invitations, cards, letterheads... 
anything you can imagine. It shows 
people something really useful 
they can do with their computers." 
—Phil Wiswell, Contributing Editor. 



1984 Games We'll Still Be 
Playing in 1985 




SPACE TAXI (Muse Soltware). "An un- 
forgettable cab ride..." 
OIL'S WELL (Sierra). "A drill.. .uh... thrill 
a minute..." 

FUGHT SIMULATOR II (SubLogic). A 
challenge to any flying ace..." 
SUMMER GAMES (Epyx). "Deserves 
an Olympic medal..." 
KINGS' QUEST (Sierra). "The first-ever 
animated graphic adventure..." 



DRAGON'S LAIR & LASER DISC 

GAMES "Really opened up a new 
level of arcade games. Even 
though Dragon's Lair seems almost 
primitive compared with current 
disc games, it was a breakthrough. 
I hope they're able to do more ." 
—Eric Babinet, 16. Youth Advisor. 




A Helping Hand 



THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING 
CHILDREN "This and similar organi- 
zations are using computer 
databases to help find missing chil- 
dren fast. Computers can check 
fingerprints and other databases 
instantly That job could take a per- 
son weeks or months to do, The 
speed of a computer makes a differ- 
ence . "—Patricia Berry, Associate Editor 



The Mouse That Roared 



COLOR PAINT (IBM). "A good 
program that does things that Mac- 
Paint does on the Mac, but it's in 
color on the IBM PC and PCjr A 
high-resolution program that's just 
terrific."— u/oan Jarg, Advisor 



Whale of a Tale 



THE VOYAGE OF THE MIMI (Ban!< Street 
College and Hoit. Binehart & Winston). 
"This project was a good attempt to 
combine a TV show [about a 
whale-watching expedition] with 
software and information about sci- 
ence. Combining these different 




elements was an exciting begin- 
ning."— Da/? Watt, Advisor. 



'Special Effects So Special You 
Couldn't Tell" Award 



-"^ <^ 



THE LAST STARFIGHTER (Lorimar Pic- 
tures). "The movie was fun, and the 
graphics were impressive — es- 
pecially the space ships that were 
created with the Cray computer." 
—Dan Lhamon, 14, Youth Advisor. 



The Best Medicine 



COMPUTERS IN MEDICINE 'New 
technology is helping the disabled. 
Ray Kurzweil's Reading Machine 
can read almost any book to the 
blind. Dr Jerrold Petrofsky of Wright 
State University uses computers to 
help paralyzed people take first 
steps. And surgeons like Dr Hector 
James use lasers to perform 
operations."— J/m Lewis, Senior Editor 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



23 



Hopping Madness! 




Q'BERT CLONES. "Games likef//p 
and Flop, Frostbite, and Juice tried 
to hop on the bandwagon of 
Q'Bert's success. The ones that 
aren't very good are just trying to 
make money off someone else's 
idea."— Scotl Rose, 12, Youth Advisor. 



Which Planet Are You On? 



THE NBC NEWS' SPINNING GLOBE. 

"The opening credits for NBC News 
programs featured a computer- 
generated p!anet Earth spinning 
around. An alert viewer noticed that 
the planet was spinning back- 
wards... .Oops! I think it cost NBC 
about $50,000 to correct the mis- 
take and get the Earth spinning the 
right way."— David Powell, Contributing 
Editor. 



Small Is Beautiful, But 
This Is Ridiculous 



PORTABLE COMPUTERS WITH TINY 
SCREENS. Carryable computers 
have made it possible to compute 
on the run— and that's good. But 
they've also caused a lot of eye- 
strain. And that's bad. "You can't 
see what you're typing, and so 
you forget what you said. They just 



drive me totally crazy' 
—Elizabeth Disney, 14, Youth Advisor. 



Whiz-Less Kids 



WHIZ KIDS (CBS Television). "This TV 
show was ridiculous. It took advan- 
tage of the hype and hysteria about 
computer break-ins and software 
piracy... And it reinforced the 
stereotypical image of the com- 
puter user as a genius. People 
have to understand that you don't 
have to be a genius to use a com- 
puter. ..Besides, the show was 
boring, and not funny at all." 
—Greg Tmtman, 17, Youth Advisor. 




Hit the DEC! Here Comes 
The Governor! 



DEC COMPUTERS IN SCHOOL? The 

Governor of New Hampshire tried 
to convince the state and the board 
of education to put DEC computers 



into third, fourth and fifth grade 
classrooms, There's no software for 
kids on these computers. There's 
no reason for schools to have 
DECS. It was a dumb idea that 
fortunately was defeated by the 
Legislature."— Dan Watt, Advisor. 



The Software Least Likely to Foster 
Cross-Cultural Understanding 




ENTER ft GUESS. > 



LA GUILLOTINE (Gessler Educational Soft- 
ware). "In this 'educational 
game,' your character lies in a 
guillotine as you try to spell out 
French words. Make enough errors, 
and the blade falls and slices off his 
head. You even get to see the head 
plop into the basket! There must be 
better ways to use the computer to 
teach languages."— /ra Wolfman, 
Editor 



Are Those Chiclets on 
the Keyboard? 



THE ORIGINAL IBM PCjr KEYBOARD . 

"The junior's keyboard — with its tiny 
chiclet keys that didn't have any 
letters on them — was one of the 
worst. Thankfully, IBM realized the 
mistake and has replaced the orig- 
inals with a PC-like keyboard." 
—Phil Wiswell. Contributing Editor 



24 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



i 



fl 



mmmm^ 



CENTER 



THE COMPUTER -USER'S HANDS-ON HANDBOOK 




•FEATURING* 



ASKElfTER: Our Help-Line 26 

BASICTRAIMNG: Programming 28 

BASIC RECOMMENDS: Sprite Software .... 29 
BASIC GLOSSARY: Computer Definitions ... 37 
BASIC PLUS: Program Notes 35 



FEEDBACK: Readers Wife 36 

PENCIL CRUNCHERS: Puzzles 37 

CONTEST #6: Win a Commodore 16! 38 

ANSWERS/NEH: Coming Attractions 40 



: 
: 



##A 




mER 




The Elan from England: 64K and a built-in joystick. 



BY DAVID B. POWELL 
##^^ 



THE ELAN COMPUTER 

DEAR ENTER: Could you give me 

any information about the Elan 
Enterprise, a new British com- 
puter? Will it come to the U.S.? 

— William Figueroa 
El Paso, TX 

DEAR WtUJAM: The Elan Enter- 
prise computer, which was 
announced last winter, is not avail- 
able yet in the U.S. The company 
hopes to have models here by 
early 1985. Below are some of the 
details of the computer as it is 
advertised in Great Britain. Keep 
in mind that the product sold here 
may be different. 

The Enterprise comes in 64K 
and 128K RAM models. The 64K 
version costs about $270. Both 
models display graphics in 256 
colors, and generate music with 
up to four simultaneous tones. 



Software includes built-in 
BASIC and word processing. 
Forth and Lisp programming lan- 
guages are also available. The 
Elan keyboard has 69 keys, a 
built-in joystick, and several user- 
programmable function keys. 



^#^ 



HOWMUCHfSWBTTS? 

DEAR ENTER: What does it mean 
when they say some computers 
are 16-bit or 32-bit? Which is 
better? —Katie Schein 

Chicago, IL 

DEAR KATIE: Computers know 
nothing about letters, numbers, 
sounds and colors. They work 
with only one kind of informa- 
tion — "bits." Each bit is an 
electronic signai thai is either "on" 
(represented by the number 1) or 
"off" (represented by 0). Every 
character, number or command 
you feed your computer has to 
be translated to a string of bits 



before the computer can make 
sense of it. 

Most computers use eight bits 
to define each character or 
number But when you talk about 
an "eight-bit computer," you're not 
discussing how many bits per 
character. Those numbers refer to 
the amount of information a com- 
puter can process at one time. 
Most inexpensive home com- 
puters, like the Commodore 64, 
are eight-bit machines. That 
means their processors can han- 
dle eight bits at one time. 

A 16-bit computer, like the IBM- 
PC, can handle twice as many ■ 
bits in each operation. The more 
bits a machine can process at 
one time, the faster it works. Re- 
cently 32-bit computers like 
the Macintosh have come on 
the market. 

### 



WANT TO BE A 
GAMEBUSTER? 



DEAR ENTER: I've heard that game 
makers have people play-test 
their games. I would be grateful 
for any information about becom- 
ing a game tester. 

—Leal Jamais Harris 
Newberry, OR 

DEAR LEAL: Yes, many companies 
use game testers. A tester might 
be asked to comment on manuals 
and instructions, to suggest 
changes, and even to try to make 
game software "crash." A tester 
may play the games at the com- 
pany headquarters, or may 
receive them in the mail. 
The best way to get to be a 



26 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



game -tester is to write the soft- 
ware company a letter. Tell them 
your age, name, address, 
telephone number, Afso let them 
know which computer and pe- 
ripherals you own, and the types 
of software you have used. It helps 
if you already know and like a 
company's games. 

Here are a few companies to 
get you going: 

• Testing Department, Broder- 
bund, 17 Paul Dr., San Rafael, CA 
94903. 

• Product Testing Manager, In- 
focom Inc., 55 Wheeler St., 
Cambridge, MA 02138. 

• Product Testing, Avalon Hill, 
4517 Hartford Rd., Baltimore, MD 
21214. 

• Software Acquisition Manager, 
Epyx, 1043 Kiel Ct., Sunnyvale, 
CA 94089. 

• Ultrasoft, 2509 152nd Ave. NE, 
Suite E, Redmond, WA 98052. 

For other companies, address 
your letter to Testing Department. 

### 



JOYSTICK PORT OUTPUT 

DEAR ENTER: Is there any way to 
use the Atari joystick ports for 
output purposes? How can I do 
it? —Alberto Ferrer 

Guaynabo, P.R. 

DEAR ALBERTO: This question is 
not as unusual as it may sound to 
some readers. Several manufac- 
turers are already hooking 
printers, modems and disks to the 
Atari through the joystick port. 

At least four of the joystick port's 
nine pins can handle either input 
or output. The trick is to know how 
to PEEK and POKE special mem- 
ory locations, and to get appro- 
priate cables (available at Radio 
Shack stores). 

Atari dealers can sell you a 



W0M 



manual which gives more informa- 
tion. It's called Technical 
Reference Notes and costs $30. 
But this isn't a manual for begin- 
ners. You'll need advanced 
technical knowledge to under- 
stand it. 



-£M^ 



AN APPLE ON YOUR IBM? 

DEAR ENTER: Is there anything that 
could let an IBM PC play Apple 
games? If there is, could you tell 
me more about it and how much 
it costs? —George Sun 

• Cherry HitI, NJ 

DEAR GEORGE: It's tricky to gel 
Apple programs to run on IBM's. 
But it is possible with special 
hardware or software. 

The best product we know of for 
doing this is something called the 
Quadlink. The Quadlink is a 64K 
Apple computer mounted on a 
single IBM PC card. You plug it 
into your IBM and you can switch 
back and forth from one computer 
to another. 

However, the Quadlink costs 
$680. At that price, you could 
almost buy a regular lie. If you're 
interested, you can contact Quad- 
ram Corp., 4355 International 
Blvd., Norcross, GA 30093. 

There are also software prod- 
ucts available that translate Apple 
files for IBM use. (But you can't 
use them to translate most store- 
bought software.) One is called 
Apple-To-IBM-PC-Or-XT File 
Transfer Program ($130). it is sold 
by Personal Computer Products, 
1400 Coleman Ave,, Suite #C-18, 
Santa Clara, CA 85050. 

If you have a question about computers or 
video games we'd like to help. Just send 
youf questions to: Q&A, ENTER Magazine, 
Cm.1 Lincoln P\., NY, NY,m23. 



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STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP 

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT AND CIR- 
CULATION (Flequifecl by 39 U S C 36851 'A Title ol Publica- 
tion ENTER Magazine 2 Dale o! Filing: October 1 . 1984 3 
Fw^uency ol issue MoniWy except tor Fefliua7 ard Augusl 
3A. No ot issues published annually: 10. 3B- Annual subscrip- 
tion price: $1 2.95 4, Complete mailing address of tmown oltice 
publication: One Lincoln Plaja. New York, New York 10023 5 
Coinplele mailing address ot the headquarters of general 
business offices dl trie publisher: One Lincoln Plaia. New 
Yof1(, New York 10023 6. Full names and complete mailing 
address ol publisher, editor ana managing editor. Publisher 
Nina S Link, ENTER Magaiine. One Lincoln Plaza. New York. 
New York 10023. Editor: Ira Walfman, ENTER Magajme. One 
Uncdn Ptaza. New York. New York 10023. l/anaging Editor 
Aura Marrero, ENTER Magazine. One Lincoln Plaza, New Yrxk. 
New York 10023, 7 Owner ChilcJiBnS Television Workshop 
One Lincoln Plaza, New York, New York 10023- 8 Known 
bondholders, morlagees. and other securily holders owning 
or holding 1 percent or nwre of loial amount ol bonds, mort- 
gages or other securities: None 9 F^rcompletion by nonprofit 
crganizalions authorized to mati at special rates (Section 
i23 t2DMM only) The purpose, lunclion. and nonprotil staius 
of this organization and the eiempl staius for Federal inconie 
!a« purposes rias rxf. changed during preceding 12 months 
10 Average no, copies each issue during preceding 12 
monihs: A, Total no. copies: 337,706, B1 Sales through deal- 
ers and carriers, street vendors and counter sales 14,980, B2 
Mail subscription 193,924 C Total paid and/or requested 
circulation: 208,904 D, Free distriBution by marl, earner or 
rther means, samples, complimentary, ant) other free copies: 
11.622 E. Total distribution: 220.526- Ft. Office use, left over, 
unaccounled. spoiled after printing: 12.820- F2 Return from 
newsagents 104.362 G. Total 337.708 Actual no copies d 
Single issue published nearest to filing dale A Tolal no cop- 
ies. 363.707. B1- Sales Ihrougti dealers and earners, slrael 
vendors and counter sales: 12,994. B2- Mail subscription: 
2S7.451. C;. Tolal paid and/or requested circulation 270,445. 
0. Free dislribution by mail, carrier or other means samples, 
complimentary, and ether tree copies. 16.018. E Tolal distribu- 
tion 286,463. Fl- Office use, left oi&. unaccounled, spoiled 
after printing: 5,233, F2 Relurn from news agents 72,011 G. 
Total: 363.707 11,1 eerlify Ihat the statemenis made by me 
above are correei and complete John Co'son. Business Man- 
ager, Periodicals Group 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



27 



aBB 



'Basic Training 

PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COMPUTER 

Apple, Adam, Atari, Commodore 64, IBM, Tl 99I4A, 
Timex-Sinclair, TRS-80, VIC-20 



'f. 



riends, ROMans, Pro- 
grammers, lend me your 
expansion slots! I come 
to debug BASIC, not to crash it. 
Out, darn bug! A mouse, a 
mouse, my keyboard for a mouse! 
Alas, poor joystick, I knew it weil, 
Horatio. What light on yonder 
monitor glows? It is DOS, and 
Juliet has CP/M." 

In our ongoing effort to raise the 
cultural level of ENTER, we decid- 
ed to begin this month's BASIC 
Training with the famous balcony 
scene from William Shakespeare's 
tragedy, MacBit. (Or was that The 
Modem of Venice?) 

You've probably noticed that 
BASIC Training is in a new part of 
the magazine. Starting this 
month, it joins our helpful tips 
column. Ask ENTER, our puzzle 
page and other useful features in 




ournew16-page ENTER CENTER 
section. 

You'll also notice that this 
month's BASIC Training includes 
program adaptations for all 
TRS-80 models and for Microsoft 
Basic (which runs on Kaypro, 
Osborne and several other 
computers). Because of limited 



space, we can't always print pro- 
grams for these computers. But 
we will cover them as often as 
possible. 

Don't forget, even though 
BASIC Training has moved, it still 
contains the usual assortment of 
great programs, the BASIC Glos- 
sary, a new Challenge and much 
more. 

On the next page, BASIC 
Recommends reports on soft- 
ware for Commodore 64 sprite 
programming. And also in this 
issue, BASIC Plus contains the 
second part of our introduction to 
Assembly language. 

But please, while you're having 
fun with your computer, don't for- 
get these immortal lines: 

"Videodisc, videodisc, where- 
fore art thou, videodisc?" 

—Richard Chevat, Technical Editor 



CIRCIIFLASH: 
TRS-80 COCO 

The TRS-80 Color Computer 
has a handy CIRCLE command. 
This program makes good use of 
it. Just type it in and RUN it. You'll 
see circles grow and shrink 
before your eyes. 

Can you create a program that 
does the same thing with a square 
or rectangle? What about other 
geometric shapes? You could 
also write a subroutine that lets 


you control the speed and 
direction of the circles with a 
joystick. 

Try combining these graphics 
effects with sound. Or see if you 
can invent a game that uses all of 
these ideas. 

10 DA3A 5.10,20,30,50,70.100 

20 PCLEAR7 

30 PMODE 0,1 :PCLS 

40 PSET (128,96) 

50 SCREEN 1,1 

60 FORP = 2T07 

70 PMODE 0, P:PCLS 

80 READR 

90 CIRCLE {128,96),(R) 


100 NEXTP 

110 FORS = 1TO200:NEXTS 

120 PMODE 0.1 V 

130 SCREEN 1,1 1 

140 FORS = 1TO120:NEXTS 

150 FORP = 2T07 

160 GOSUB 220 i 

170 NEXT P "^ 

180 FORP = 7T01STEP -1 

190 GOSUB 220 « 

200 NEXT P i 

210 GOTO 120 9 

220 PMODE 0,P 1 

230 SCREEN 1,1 

240 FORS = 1TO80:NEXTS 

250 RETURN 

—Daniel E. Cohen 



28 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



aa 



NOISE MAKER: 

COMMODORE 64 

AND VIC-20 

Sure, you can draw on your 

computer screen with a joystick 
(see, for example, our "Sketch- 
man" program this month). But 
have you ever seen a program 
that lets you make music with a 
joystick? Of course, not all the 
sounds this program creates will 
be music to everyone's ears, but 
there's no accounting for taste. 

Just run "Noise Maker" and 
push the joystick in different 
directions for different sounds. 
Push the fire button to change the 
pitch of the sounds. This program 
would make a great sound routine 
in a game or graphics program. 
Note: the VIC-20 version does not 
use the joystick. Hit keys G, H, K 
and L to produce the sounds. Hit 
the space bar to change the 
sounds. 

Noise f^aker was written by 
Charles Ardai, 14, of New York 
City. 

COMMODORE 64: 




10 


PRINT CHR$ (147) 


20 


PRINT TAB(211)"N0ISE 




MAKER" 


30 


S = 54272 :FOR X = S TO S -1- 24 


40 


POKEX,0:NEXT 


se 


POKES -1-24.15 


60 


HF = INT(RND(l)*80)-i-10 


70 


LF = INT(RND(1)*255) 


80 


P = PEEK{56320) 


S0 


IF P= 127 THEN 80 


100 


IF P= 111 THEN 60 


110 


IF P = 126 THEN 




WV = 128:AD = 145:HF = HF 




-1-10 


120 


IF P= 123 THEN 




WV = 32:AD = 96;HF = HF-5 


130 


IF P= 119 THEN 




WV=16:AD=142:HF = HF 




+ 5 


140 


IFF =125 THEN 




WV=16:AD = 6:HF = HF-10 



150 IFHF<10THENHF = HF-i-25 

160 IFHF>90THENHF = HF-25 

170 POKES.LF.POKES + l.HF 

180 POKES 4- 5, AD: POKE 

S-i-6,AD 

190 P0KES-i-4,WV+l 

200 FORZ = 1TO300:NEXT 

210 POKES -I- 4.0 

220 POKE AD ,0 : GOTO 80 

VIC-20: 



10 PRINT CHR$(147) 

20 PRINT TAB (50) "NOISE 

MAKER" 

30 T = 36874:A = T-H 

40 S=T-Hi:N=T-)-3:V=T+4 

50 FORX = TT0V 

60 POKEX,0:NEXT 

70 POKE V 15 

80 P = INT(RND{0)*103)-I-138 

90 GETKS 

100 IFK$=""THENFORX = lTO 

V;POKE X.0 

110 F KS = " " THEN 90 

120 IFI3 = " "THEN 80 

130 IF KS = "G" THEN POKE T,P 

140 IF K$="H" THEN POKE A,P 

150 IF KS = ■' J" THEN POKE S,P 

160 IF KS = "K" THEN POKE N.P 

170 FORSR = lTO3fl0:NEXT 

180 FORPL=TTOV:POKE 

PL,0:NEXT:POKEV15 

190 GOTO 90 

—Charles Ardai 
(BASIC Training continues on next page) 



BASIC 
R ECOMMENDS 

One of the Commodore 64 's 
best features is its sprite chip. 
This allows you to program and 
animate up to eight small 
graphic figures. However, pro- 
gramming those sprites can be 
a long, tedious job. The worst 
part is probably designing the 
sprite itself. First you have to 
plot out each pixel on a 24 by 
21 grid. Then, you have to 
translate ai! those dots into 
numbers in DATA statements. 

There are a few software 
packages around that will help 
you through this process. The 
best that we have seen is 
called Spritemaster. 

This software allows you to 
draw sprites with a joystick on 
an easy-to-see screen display 
You can easily erase all or part 
of your design, see how it looks 
in different colors, and save up 
to 160 sprites right on the 
Spr/temaster disk. Once you 
have finished, Spr/femasfer will 
figure out the correct DATA 
statements and add them to 
the end of your BASIC program. 

Spritemaster makes it easy 
to design several sprites for an 
animation sequence. Once you 
have one sprite ready, you can 
save it, then change it slightly 
in a second version, save that, 
and so on. Then Spritemaster 
wilt animate your sprites, display- 
ing them in any sequence you 
wish, at different speeds. 

Spritemaster is a product of 
Access Software, 925 East 900 
South, Salt Lake City Utah 
84105. it sells for $39.95. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



29 



Basic Trainm 



(BASIC Training cant, from previous page) 



MERCURY MONITOR: 

ADAM, APPLE, ATARI. 

COMMODORE 64, IBM, MICROSOFT 

BASIC, TI99I4A, TIMEX-SINCLAIR, 

TRS-80, VIC-20 



The thermometer says it's 30 
degrees outside, so you'd better 
put on your winter jacket, right? 
But in most parts of the world, 30 
degrees means it's time to get out 
the sun tan lotion and head for the 
beach. Are we talking about 
strange lands where people like 
to go swimming among icebergs? 
No, it's just that in most countries, 
30 degrees means 30 degrees 
centigrade — which is 86 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 

Centigrade Is the metric system 
of temperature measurement. The 
United States is one of the few 
countries in the world where it is 
not commonly used. But as the 
country slowly switches over to 
metric, you'll probably be seeing 
centigrade temperatures more 
and more. 

How will you know whether it's 
time to go to the beach or put on 
your parks? You could learn the 
conversion formulas, or you could 



use this handy program written by 
Richard Hung, 13, of Massena, 
NY. It will convert Fahrenheit to 
centigrade or vice-versa. It can 
also display a series of tem- 
peratures in both systems, side 
by side. 

The heart of the program lies in 
two conversion formulas in 
subroutines 458 and 50© . The for- 
mula on line 460 converts Fahren- 
heit to centigrade. Line 5l0's for- 
mula converts centigrade to Fahr- 
enheit. 

How does the program know 
which formula to use? The DBF 
FN commands in lines 460 and 510 
defines function C(T) as the correct 
formula. Then the temperature is 
converted in line 250. (What does 
DBF FN do? See this month's 
BASIC Glossary.) 

Below is the program for Apple 
and Adam, followed by adapta- 
tions for other computers. 

APPII, ADAM: 



10 

20 
30 



40 



REM TEMPERATURE 
CONVERSION PROGRAM 
TEXT : HOME 
PRINT "THIS IS A 
TEMPERATURE 
CONVERSION PROGRAM" 
PRINT: PRINT "(1) 
CONVERTING FAHRENHEIT 
TO CENTIGRADE" 



50 PRINT " (2) CONVERTING 

CENTIGRADE TO 

FAHRENHEIT" 
60 PRINT "(3) QUIT" 
70 PRINT ; PRINT "INPUT THE 

NUMBER OF YOUR 

CHOICE"; 
80 INPUT A ■ 
90 IFA>3 0RA<1 THEN 

GOTO 20 
100 ON A GOSUB 450,500,550 
110 HOME 

120 PRINT F$ ;•' TO ";T$ 
130 PRINT : PRINT "WOULD YOU 

LIKE" 
140 PRINT "(1) A CONVERSION 

TABLE" 
150 PRINT " (2) INDIVIDUAL 

CONVERSIONS" 
160 PRINT "(3) EXIT" 
170 PRINT ; PRINT "INPUT THE 

NUMBER OF YOUR CHOICE" 
180 INPUTS 

190 ON B GOTO 300,210,20 
200 GOTO 120 
210 HOME 
220 PRINT "WHAT ";F$; " 

TEMPERATURE WOULD" 
230 PRINT "YOU LIKE TO 

CONVERT TO ";T$ 
240 INPUT F 
250 FC = FN C(F) 
260 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT "THE 

";T$;" TEMPERATURE IS" 
270 PRINT FC; " DEGREES" 
280 FORP = 1 TO 2000 
290 NEXTP: GOTO 110 
300 PRINT : PRINT "INPUT 

STARTING TEMPERATURE"; 
310 INPUT E 

(Progfam continues on next page) 




30 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



(Prograw continued from previous page) 

320 PRINT " INPUT ENDING 

TEMPERATURE"; 
330 INPUT G 

340 IF E > G THEN GOTO 300 
350 PRINT F$ , T$ : PRINT 
360 SPEED = 150 
370 FOR F = E TO G 
380 LET I = FN C{F) 
390 PRINT TAB( 5); EI 
400 NEXT F 
410 SPEED =255 
420 PRINT : PRINT "HIT ANY 

KEY TO CONTINUE" 
430 INPUT R$ 
440 GOTO 110 
450 REM FAHRENHEIT TO 

CENTIGRADE 
460 DEF FN C(F) = (F - 32) * 5 / 

9 
470 F$ = "FAHRENHEIT" 
480 T$ = "CENTIGRADE" 
490 RETURN 
500 REM CENTIGRADE TO 

FAHRENHEIT 
510 DEF FN C(F) = F * (9 / 5) + 

32 
520 F$ = "CENTIGRADE" 
530 T$ = "FAHRENHEIT" 
540 RETURN 
550 HOME 
560 PRINT "BYE! ": END 

COMMODORE B4 AND VIC-20: 

Delete lines 360 and 410. Change 
lines 20, 110, 210 and 550 to: 

PRINT CHR$(147) 

IBM AND TRS-SO: Delete lines 360 
and 410. Change lines 20, 110, 210 
and 550 to: CLS 

MICROSOFT BASIC: Delete lines 
360 and 410. Change lines 20, 110, 
210 and 550 to; print chr$(12) 
Change line 90 to read: 

90 IF (A > 3) * {A <1) then 20 

ATARI: Delete lines 360 and 410. 
Change lines 20, 110, 210 and 550 
to; PRINT CHR$(125). 

Add or change these lines, 
NOTE: In line 390 hold the ESC 
key and press the TAB key. 

5 DIMF$(10),T${10),R$(10) 
250 IF V = l THEN 258 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 




TI39/4A: Delete lines 360 and 4ic. 

Change lines 20, 110, 210 and 550 

to; CALL CLEAR. 

Add or change these lines; 




TIMEX-SINCLAIR: Delete lines 360 
and 410. Change lines 20, 110, 210 
and 550 to; CLS 
Add or change these lines: 

100 IF A = 1 THEN GOTO 450 

105 IF A = 2 THEN GOTO 500 

108 GOTO 550 

190 IF B = l THEN GOTO 300 

192 ff'B = 2 THEN GOTO 210 

195 IF B = 3 THEN GOTO 20 

250 IF V=l THEN GOTO 258 

252 LETFC=F*(9/5) +32 

254 GOTO 260 

258 LET FC = (F- 32) * 5/9 

280 FOR 1=1 TO 500 

380 IFV=1 THEN 388 

382 LETI = H*(9/5) +32 

384 GOTO 390 

388 LETI=(H-32) *5/9 

390 PRINT TAB 5; H.I 

460 LETV=1 

510 LETV=2 —Richard Hung 

(BASIC Training continues on next page) 



BASIC GLOSSARY: 
DEFFN 

DEF FN is a command found 
in many versions of BASIC. It 
stands for DERne FuNction. 
DEF FN's name describes what 
it does. In BASIC, you can de- 
fine a variable to equal a 
number For example, you can 
have a line defining the varia- 
ble X as equal to 10: 

LET X = 10 

DEF FN allows you to define 
a function variable as a mathe- 
matical formula. For example, 
you could define the function X 
as a formula this way: 

DEFFNX(A) = A + (12*B) 

Once you have defined a 
function, you can use it any- 
where in a program and it will 
have the same effect as writing 
out the whole formula. So, in 
our example above, writing 
LET I = FN X(A) is the same as 
writing: 

LETI = A + (12"B) 

You can also change the 
variable that you want the for- 
mula to act upon. For example, 
LET I = FN x<C) in our example 
would be the same writing let 
1= c+ U2*B}. 

DEF FN is useful in cases 
like our "fvlercury Monitor" pro- 
gram. Using DEF FN, the 
equation in line 250 can be 
defined as either formula . 

Here's how it works. At line 
100, the program will GOTO line 
450, 500 or 550. if the program 
goes to line 450, the formula 
wilt be Fahrenheit to cen- 
tigrade. If the program goes to 
line 500, the formula will be 
centigrade to Fahrenheit. If it 
goes to 550, the program ends. 



ENTER 



31 



Basic Trainm 



(BASIC Training cont. from previous page) 

CHALLENGE #11: 
SOUND OFF! 

This month, when we say we 
want to hear from all you program- 
mers out there, we really mean it. 
We want you to write a program 
that uses your compi 'ter's ability 
to make noise. (And we don't 
mean the sound of you yelling at it 
when your program crashes.) 

You can write a program that 
helps you make music, or sound 



effects, or a noisemaker like the 
Commodore programs in this is- 
sue. Try to come up with some- 
thing original . How about a 
program that matches sound to 
the mood of the user? 

Send your program to 
CHALLENGE #11, ENTER 
Magazine, CTW. 1 Lincoln Plaza, 
N.Y.,N.Y. 10023. We'll pick the 
best programs and print them in 
BASIC Training. The winners will 
receive $25 and an ENTER T-shirt. 

All entries must be your original 
work. Programs can be for any 
home computer. Remember 



to enclose a note telling us your 
name, age, T-shirt size, the com- 
puter the program was written for, 
and a brief description of what the 
program does. 

Entries must be postmarked no 
later than January 31, 1985. We 
read every program that is sent in. 
but we cannot reply to each and 
everyone of you. 

And remember, if you've written 
any other programs you think be- 
long in ENTER, send them to 
BASIC Training at the address 
above. We pay between $25 and 
$50 for programs we publish. 



WINNERS OF 

CHAL1£NGE #5; 

MATH ORBIT: 

IBM PCirAND PC WITH COLOR 
GRAPHICS CARD 



A lot of the responses to this 
Challenge were programs that 
tested you in basic math. We 
liked this one by Jim Wagner ol 
Arnold, Missouri, because of the 
original graphics that it creates. 

The program draws a view of 
outer space, including the earth, 
the moon and your rocket ship. 
When you answer a question 
correctly, your ship gets closer to 
the moon. An incorrect response 
sends you backwards. And you 
better get the first question right, 
or you won't even blast off. 






32 



ENTEFI 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



3aE:=r7T3:::a: 



■laa 











(Program continued from previous page) 


620 


FOR S = 262 TO 523 STEP 




PLAY AGAIN" ;A$ 






10:SOUNDS, liNEXTS: 


640 


IFA$="Y"ORA$="y" 


610 PRINT "YOU'VE MADE IT TO 




SOUND 523,20 




THEN 10 


THE MOON IN " ;T; ■' TRIES" 


630 


PRINT: INPUT "WANT TO 




-Jim Wagner 


BINARY CONVERTER: 


80 


PRINT : INPUT "PICK ONE 


280 


PRINT "TYPE IN A DECIMAL 






<1-3>";A 


/ 


NUMBER" 


APPLE 


90 


ON A GOTO 110,270.480 


290 


PRINT "(NO HIGHER THAN 




100 


GOTO 60 




255) " 


Challenge #8 asked you to 


110 
120 


HOME : PRINT 

PRINT "TYPE IN A BINARY 


300 
310 


FORI = 23 TO 25 
VTAB 12: HTAB I 


create some "math magic." This 




NUMBER" 


320 


GET AS: A = ASC {A$ ) 


winning program was entered by 


130 


PRINT "(UP TO EIGHT 


330 


IF A > 47 AND A < 58 THEN 


Paul Muller, 14, of Lakewood, 




DIGITS) " 




350 


Colorado, it can convert any 


140 


FOR I = 23 TO 30 


340 


VTAB 12: HTAB I: GOTO 310 


decimal number from 1 to 255 to 


150 
160 


VTAB12:HTABI 
GETA$ 


350 


PRINT A$:B$ = B$ + A$ : 
NEXT 


binary form. It also converts the 


170 


IFA$ = "0"ORA$ = "1" 


360 


IF VAL (B$ ) > 255 THEN 270 


other way from binary to decimal. 




THEN 190 


370 


B = VAL(B$):B$ = "" 


This program would be especially 


180 


VTAB 12: HTAB I: GOTO 150 


380 


A$ = "" 


helpful to anyone who is doing 


190 


PRINT A$:B$ = B$ + A$ : 
NEXT 


390 
400 


FORI = 7TO0STEP-1 

A$ = "0" 


some serious programming. 


200 


D = 0:FORI = 0TO7 


410 


IF INT (B / (2 ■ I)) > = 1 THEN 


10 HOME : VTAB 5 


210 


IFMID$(B$,8-I,1) = "1" 




A$ = "r':B = B-2 I 


20 PRINT "BINARY-DECIMAL 




THEN D = D + 2 I 


420 


B$ = B$ + A$ 


CONVERTER" 


220 


NEXT 


430 


NEXT 


30 POKE 34,9 


230 


PRINT "THE DECIMAL 


440 


PRINT "THE BINARY 


40 HOME 




NUMBER IS ";D 




NUMBER IS ";B$ 


50 PRINT " 1 . BINARY TO 


240 


A$ = "":B$ = "" 


450 


PRINT : PRINT "PRESS ANY 


DECIMAL" 


250 


PRINT : PRINT "PRESS ANY 




KEY TO CONTINUE"; 


60 PRINT "2. DECIMAL TO 




KEY TO CONTINUE" 


460 


GETZ$ 


BINARY" 


260 


GET Z$ : GOTO 40 


470 


B$ = "": GOTO 40 


70 PRINT "3. END" 


270 


HOME : PRINT :B$ = "" 


480 


END —Paul Muller 











SKETCHMAN: 
J199I4A 

We often receive programs that 
let you draw on your screen with a 
joystick. This program, by Jeff Ed- 
wards, 13, of Dunkirk f\/laryland 
had a nice twist. It lets you draw 
on your screen with a little round 
monster who eats a line while 
making a loud chomping noise- 
Sound crazy? Try it and see. 

10 CALL SCREEN (2) 
2« CALL CHAR(33, 

"FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF " ) 
313 CALL COLOR( 1,1 3,1) 
40 CALLCHAR{40, 




•* 7EEFFFC2C1 FFFF7E " ) 
50 GALL COLOR(2,7,1) 
60 CALL CHAR (41,. 

" 7EFFFFFFFFFFFF7E " ) 



70 


CALL CHAR (42,"") 


80 


CALL CLEAR 


90 


CALL HCHARd, 1,33,768) 


100 


X=15 


110 


Y=13 


120 


CALLJOYST(l,DX,DY) 


130 


X = X--DX/4 


140 


Y = Y-DY/4 


150 


X = INT(32*((X-l)/32- 




INT({X-l)/32))) + l 


160 


Y = INT(24*((Y-l)/24- 




INT((Y-l)/24))) + l 


170 


CALL SOUND(200, - 8,0) 


180 


CALL VCHAR(Y,X.40) 


190 


FORK= 1TO20 


200 


NEXTK 


210 


CALL VCHAR{Y,X,41) 


220 


CALL VCHAR(YX,42) 


230 


GOTO 120 




—Jeff Edwards 


(BASIC Training continues on next page) 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



33 



Basic Training 



(BASIC Training cont. from previous page) 

BY A PROGRAM, 
FOR A PROGRAM: 

IBM PCjr AND PC WITH COLOR 
GRAPHICS CARD 



The first program you see below 
is a short graphics program that 
creates a colorful design on IBM 
computers. It's nice, but you 
might get tired of it. You can 
change the design by changing 
the program in lines 60 and 100. Or 
you can use the second program 
to make the changes for you. 

The second program will 
actually write and save different 
versions of the first program on 
your disk. First, it will ask you for 
the name of the program you will 
create. Then it will display a circle 
on your screen. You use function 
keys 1 through 4 to change the 
size and shape of the circle. 
When you're done, press function 
5. This saves your new program 
on your disk. 

PROGRAM I 




PROGRAM II 



10 


ON ERROR GOTO 430 


20 


SCREEN 2 :CLS 


30 


INPUT " WHAT FILE DO YOU 




WISH OUTPUT TO GO TO" : 




FILE$ 


40 


IF FILES = " " THEN 30 


50 


SCREEN 1:CLS:F0R R = 1 TO 




10:KEYR,"":NEXTR 


60 


KEY1,"AL + ":KEY2. 





"AT+":KEY3,"G":KEY4. 




•■S":KEY5,"E" 


70 


REM DRAW CIRCLE 


80 


A = 160:B = 100:C = 20:D=2: 




E = 1:F = 1 


90 


IFB<10THENB = 10 


100 


IFA<10THENA = 10 


110 


IFB>190THENA = 190 


120 


IFA>630THENA = 630 


130 


CmCLE(A,B),CX)„.E/F 


140 


G$=INKEY$:IFa$ = "" 




THEN 140 


150 


IFG$="G"THEN 




CLS:C = C + l:GO'iU90 


160 


IFG$ = "S"THEN 




CLS:C = C-1:GOTO90 


170 


IF G$ = "A" THEN GOTO 240 


180 


IF 0$ = "8" THEN 




CLS:B=B-l:GO'i"0 90 


190 


IFG$ = "6"THEN 




CLS:A=A + l:Gai"U90 


200 


IFG$ = "4"THEN 




CLS.A=A~l:GarO90 


210 


IFG$="2"THEN 




CLS:B=B + l;GOiO90 


220 


IFG$ = "E"THEN300 


230 


GOTO 140 


240 


TG$ = INKEY$;1F TG$ = '"• 




THEN 240 


250 


YU = YU+1 


260 


IFYU = 1THEN 




U0$ = TG$: GOTO 240 ELSE 




UO$=UO$ + TG$:YU = 


270 


IFUO$ = "L + "THEN 




CLS;F=F + .l:GO'lug0 


280 


IFUO$="T+"THEN 




CLS;E = E + .1:GOTO90 


290 


REM CREATE Fn.K 


300 


OPEN FILES FOR OUTPUT 




AS#1 


310 


PRINT #1.-10 ON ERROR 




GOTO 110" 


320 


PRINT #1,"20 CO =0" 


330 


PRINT #1,"30 KEY OFF" 


340 


PRINT #1. "40 SCREEN 1:CLS" 


350 


PRINT #1." 50 




S = S + 3.123456789#" 


360 


PRINT #1.-60 CIRCLE {"A", 




"B"),S,C.„"E'7"F 


370 


PRINT #1. "70 READ C" 


380 


PRINT #1,"80 COLOR 




CO:A=A + l" 


390 


PRINT #1," 90 IF A = 140 THEN 




END ELSE GOTO 50" 


400 


PRINT #1,-100 DATA. 




1,2,3,1,2,3" 


410 


PRINT #1,-110 




RESTORE ;RESUME" 


420 


CLOSE 1:END 


430 


REM ON ERROR 


440 


IFE<0THENE = 0: 



RKSUME 90 


450 FF<0THENF=0: 


RESUME 90 —Gregory Snyder 


FORCE FIELD: 


ATARI 


This graphics program for 


Atari computers gives your 


screen a sci-fi appearance. It 


also has great sound effects, 


"Force Field" was written by 


Craig Baldwin, age 14, of 


Madison, Wisconsin. 


10 A = 0:B = 79:C = 39:Q = 40 


20 S=131:I = 1 


30 GRAPHICS 5: SETCOLOR 


2,0,0 


40 F0RL = 1T0Q 


50 SOUND 3,S,10.15 J^ 


60 S = S + 3:COLORZ 


70 GOSUB 1000 


80 A = A + 1:B = B-1:C = C-1 


90 Z = Z + 1:IFZ = 3THENZ = 1 


100 NEXTL 


110 A = A-1:B = B + 1:C = C + 1 


120 FORL = 1TOO | 


130 SOUND 3.8.10,15 8 


140 S = S + 1:C0L0RZ ':' 


150 GOSUB 1000 


160 A = A-1:B = B + 1:C = C + 1 


170 Z = Z + 1:IFZ = 3THENZ = 1 


180 NEXTL 


190 A = A + 1:B=B-1:C = C-1 


200 a = Q-I:IFQ<lTHEN 


210 IFQ>39THENI = 1 i 


220 GOTO 40 1 


1000 PLOTA,A 1 


1010 DRAWTOB,A i 


1020 DRAWTOB.C 1 


1030 DRAWTOA,C 4 


1040 DRAWTOA,A 


1050 RETURN —Craig Baldwin 


CORRECTION: 


In our October issue, the 


adaptation of "Spiral Mania" 


for Atari should have included 


this line: 


300 NEXTX 



34 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



BASIC PLUS 

Assembfy Language, Part tl 



BY MARK SUTTON-SMITH 

Last month's BASIC Plus 
introduced you to the world of 
assembly-language pro- 
gramming. Naturally, after reading 
about the speed, graphics and 
other wonders of assembly as 
reported by yours truly you 
decided to dive head-first into this 
new programming language. 
Now, all you want to know is, "How 
can I, too, learn to speak the true 
language of computers?" 

Well, you've come to the right 
place. But first, a word of warning 
to the beginner: assembly is 
much harder to learn than BASIC. 
So be ready for some hard but 
rewarding work. {It would a!so be a 
good idea to have a friend, relative 
or teacher around who can answer 
your questions.) 

The first thing you'll need to 
know is which kind of assembly 
language your computer uses. 
This depends on the type of 
microprocessor your computer is 
built around. The Apple, Atari and 
Commodore 64 all contain a 6502 
microprocessor. When you write 
an assembly language program 
for one of these machines, it has 
to be in 6502 language. The 
Radio Shack TRS-80 Color 
Computer has the 6809 chip, the 
Tl 99 4/A uses a TMS 9900, and 
IBM uses the 8088. 

Next, you're going to have to 
buy a piece of software called an 
editor-assembler. What does this 
do? First, it allows you to type in 




and change an assembly- 
language program (that's the edit 
part). Then it will turn what you 
type into machine-usable code 
(yep, that's the assembler). If 
you've programmed in BASIC, 
you've already used a very similar 
program, the BASIC interpreter 

When you type the word RUN 
on your computer, you are really 
starting your BASIC interpreter. 
The interpreter translates the first 
line of your BASIC program into 
machine binary code. It executes 
that tine. If it works, the interpreter 
repeats the process with the next 
line. An assembler does some- 
thing similar. But it translates the 
entire program first, and stores the 
machine code in memory until you 
want to run ft. 

There are many good editor- 
assemblers on the market. Here 
are a few I can recommend: 
APPLE: The Merlin Assembler, by 
Southwestern Software, $109 
ATARI: Atari Editor/ Assembler, by 
Atari, $56 
COMMODORE 64: The Commodore 



Assembler, by Comnnodore, $49.95 
IBM: MASM by Microsoft, $100 
TRS-8Q Color Computer: Editor/ 
Assembler by Motorola, $49.95 

You'll probably also want an 
instruction book to help you get 
started. A few of the good ones are: 

Programming the 6502 by 
Rodney Zaks, Sybex Publishers, 
$13,95 

IBM PC Assembly Language by 
LeoScanlon, Brady Publishers, 
$19.95 

Color Computer Assembly 
Language Programming, published 
by Radio Shack, $6.95 

When you get set up, start by 
writing short programs that let you 
explore the things assembly can do 
that BASIC can't. Write programs 
that create sound or graphics so you 
can see the results right away Even if 
you never design your own Zaxxon 
or Space invaders, you'll learn a lot 
atx)ut what is really happening 
inside you r computer. H 

MARK SUTTON-SMITH Is an ENTm 
contributing editor. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



35 



►M 




ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT 

Although your magazine is 
terrific, I have an idea that would 
improve it even more. 

Not all of the people that read 
your magazine are beginners. So 
why don't you devote a page a 
month explaining more advanced 
methods on computers? The first 
month you could explain how to 
program the joystick to respond to 
arcade games for the Commo- 
dore 64 and VIC-20. Or maybe 
explain how to make data files. 

— Erin Smothers 
Sacrarnento, CA 

Dear Erin: 

Could it be that you own a 
Commodore 64 or VIC-20? 

Kidding aside, your point 
about the concerns of 
programmers is well taken. 
ENTER is taking strides in that 
very direction. We recently started 
our BASIC Plus page . Now, in 
addition to printing programs 
every month in BASIC Training, 
BASIC Plus wilt contain advice 
and information to help you write 
your own programs. 

For instance, the first two 
installments of BASIC Plus gave 
tips on how to debug a program. 
Future BASIC Plus topics will 
include the best ways to structure 
programs, how to write programs, 
and ways to create and use 
data files. 

We try to answer very specific 
questions, like how to read the 
joystick on a Commodore 64. in 
our ASK ENTER department. But 
remember, sometimes the 



b6st place to look for the answer 

is right in your owner's manual. 

—Ed. 

MORE DOGGONE DATA 

In October's "Bits," you have an 
article entitled "Dog Data" that 
mentions the Select-a-Pooch 




software used by an anima! 
shelter in New Yorl<. I thought you 
might lil<e to l<now that the same 
service is offered by Kaf-Kan Dog 
Food. Theirs is called Setecf-a- 
Dog. —Rebecca R. Terrill 

Hampton, VA 

Z0RK1,KAYPR02 

In your July/August '84 issue on 
page 17, 1 saw the advertisement 
"How to blow up a rubber raft." In 
the ad, it said that Zork I is 
compatible with almost every 
popular home computer. I wanted 
to buy Zork I, but my computer is 
a Kaypro 2, which is not a home 
computer. Do you l<now if Zork I 



will work on my computer? 

— Amy Marie Coen 
Phoenix, AZ 

Dear Amy: 

Yes, Zork is available for your 
Kaypro 2 and many other home 
computers. — Ed. 

IN SEARCH OF SOFTWARE 

I never know where to buy the 
games that you review. 

— Clark Hoover 
South Bend, IN 

Dear Clark: 

Probably the best way to avoid 
running all over town to find 
software is to pick up the phone. 
Call stores in your area 
(department stores with toy or 
computer sections, computer 
stores, even some video stores) 
that you know or think might sell 
game software. If they don't sell 
the game you're looking for, they 
may be able to tell you the com- 
pany that distributes the games. 

The Business-to-BUsiness 
Yellow Pages, which you should 
find at your local library, will also 
list video game distributors. Write 
them for a list of the stores that 
sell the product you want. — Ed. B 

WRITE TO US! 

ENTER wants to hear from 
you! Our CompuServe ID is 
72456. 1776. Or write to us 
at ENTER, 1 Lincoln Piaza, 
New York. NY 10023. 



36 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



'Pencil 




\0 



mNCHERS 



FLOPPY TRAILS 

BYBEtASEL£NDY,16 

Does this computer-generated 
maze look familiar to you? Look a 
little closer. That's right— it's the 



a-maze-ing floppy disk! ENTER's 
youth advisor Bela Selendy cre- 
ated this maze on his school's 
Apple lie. It took him over an hour 
to draw in all the lines by guiding 
the cursor on the computer 

The information on this disk can 
be accessed only by driving your 



pencil carefully from ENTER to 
EXIT. Watch out for dead ends 
and passageways that go the 
wrong way. After you've input all 
your information, GOTO page 40 
and see if you've got the right 
answer 
Good luck! 




JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



37 




TRAPPED IN TIME! 

WiNA 

Commodore 16! 




z 

s 

o 



BY JIM LEWIS AND ANDREW G I A N G L A 



MM crew of 16 Commodore 16s is sailing on the sea. 
^^ (They don't call 'em C-16s for nothing.) But the 
■■T evil Lord Epoch has some nasty designs on 
these Cs. Epoch wants to put all computers in 
permanent downtime, using his devastating data- 
processing powers to take complete control of time. 
But you can stop Epoch — and win one of the 16 C-16s 
for your very own! All you've got to do is travel through 
time and solve Epoch's complex compilation of 
historical hints, 

HOW TO PLAY 



1. Follow Epoch's every step through history. Fill in the 
blanks that ask for the name of a specific event, 
person, book, or other historic happening. 

2. After you've answered every question, find out what 
year an event happened (or the years the person you 
named lived). Place the 12 answers in the order they 
happened through history. With all the answers in 



chronological order, read off the first letter of each 
answer. That will spell out where the crew of computers 
is being held. Write this answer down. 

3. Once you've got that answer, go back through the 
questions and search for clues that lead you to the 
crew of captured computers. Write down as many 
clues as you can find. 

4. Send all these answers to: "Trapped in Time," 
ENTER Magazine, P.O. Box 777, Ridgefield, NJ 07657. 
Your answers must arrive no later than February 15, 
1985. Remember to include your name, address, age 
and phone number, so we can contact you if you're a 
winner. All entrants must be under 18 years of age. 

The ENTER staff will judge all entries and select the 
top 16 on the basis of accuracy, completeness, and 
creative presentation. The more clues you include, the 
better your chance of winning. The top 16 entrants will 
each win one of the Commodore 16s (and an angry 
grimace from evil Lord Epoch). Winners will be notified 
by April 10, 1985. 



38 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



/Suddenly, you're sailing through a time warp whirl- 
pool. You jump from era to era. but at first there is 
^F no pattern. Finally, you come to things of shape, 
Your sidekick, Bromley Kent, lends you a hand. You're 
at a place that's small and large at the same time, And 
at the moment you land, a famous fracas is going on. 
In general, this is no time to be sitting around. You're at 
the battle of. 



71s that a bird, a lone eagle perhaps? No, it's a 
lucky man soaring across the ocean. He's flying 
^■F through the heavens, but what does he have for 
lunch, the food of the gods? Flying from the U.S. to 
France is a feat in this year Of course, in the present 
it's done time after time. Still, you're proud to be along 
for the ride with a hero whose last name is 



2 Be warned! And cling on to your hat. As a true 
time traveller, you know something's wrong 
■V aboard this machine. The captain is on the beam, 
but your star-filled vehicle has blown up. You say good- 
bye to the ship, , and move on. 



Ac Evil Epoch surrender! The planets revolve around 
\^ the sun, not you. It has been proven by this 
■IF famous figure, who used a telescope to prove the 
point. Where is he? Dropping a light and a heavy 
object off the tower that leans. Discovery never stops 
when your name is 



3 Voyaging now in turbulent seas, you find yourself 
heading west with Anthony on the good ship 
^■^ Beagle. You pass a shipwreck and barely make it 
past Dr M's volcanic island, then pass Tono-Bungay 
You meet a man with something to say about the 
beginnings of a race, Don't let him make a monkey out 
of you. He'll publish his most original book this year; 
right now, all he wants to talk about is his theory of 



4 It's been said that Herbert George put the first 
men in the moon. But now you've landed around 
^■r the time of Elvis and the Fabians. Flight into space 
begins. In October, a tiny first satellite sails into orbit. 
Its name, of course, is 



5 Look out! You zip over London and speed past 
France. The Duke of Wellington is defeating his 
^^ rival at this place. It's home to a battle that will 
change the outline of history, but this place sounds like 
it's all wet. Is it because of the rain, Claude? That would 
be fitting in a place called 



eAway we go! Set to sea, lady but look up in the 
sky! We're in New Jersey of all places, not far from 
fgg^ Grovers Mills. A giant airship from across the sea 
has burst into flames. A great tragedy occurred when 
the exploded. 



9 In the whirlpool again and back to New Jersey 
Everyone is wearing strange costumes for some 
^W reason. The radio tells you that Martians have 
landed. Is this a hoax or a real war of worlds? 
Anticipations abound, What's the full name of the 
citizen behind this confusion? 



gt MMaWmg your way through history, you might get 
M ^# lost. You'll need a little marker so you won't 
^^^ miss the boat. In fact, you hear someone 
singing about a Good Ship Lollipop, On the silver 
screen, you see a curly-haired kid who was a star in 
these years. Though her smile is sunny her name isn't 
Rebecca; it's 



WNow what's this? You're almost down for the 
count. But. like Mr Britling, you'll see it through. 
Mtt^ Here's a giant computing device with vacuum 
tubes— the first machine of its kind to be bought and 
used by business. To keep track of the population, 
the census bureau counted on 



g ^^0 escape. Epoch. Your mind is at the end of 
§itm its tether We'll get help here from this old-time 
g^^ medicine man, who has made an oath that 
others will follow. With help from this "father-figure" 

named we'll cure your madness and make 

you reveal where the C-16s are. S 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



39 




COMING IN OUR MARCH ISSUE: 



COMPUTERS IN SPACE: Ride with astronaut Anna Fisher 
aboard the shuttle Discovery— ar\6 find out how 
computers help run the shuttle. Then learn how 
Mission Control computer experts deal with out-of-this 
world computer problems, like the dreaded DiPs Malf, 

COMPUTER CAMP '85: Is computer camp right for you? 
What are the alternatives? How do you choose 
between all the different types? The answers to these 
questions in our annual guide to Keyboard Camping. 

ROUND-UP TIME: ENTER sheds light on light pens with 
a review of these new graphic controllers... And, a 



preview of top computer printers. 

CURSOR, FOILED AGAIN: Evil Cursor has trapped you 
inside a computer. Can you escape? Or will you be 
caught in a programming loop? An interactive game 
you play right in the magazine — from the creator of 
"The Ice Pirates." 

PLUS: Return of Gonzo Games, your silly serving of 
outlandish game ideas. ..The story of 'Pinbafi 
Construction Set' software designer Bill Budge.. .And, 
of course, computer projects in ENTER Center, our 
hands-on programming and high-tech help section. 



'Answers 



PERPLIXING PIXELS (Page 57) 



; 


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FLOPPY TRAILS (Page 37) 




40 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1965 




PHOGRmS FOR YOUH COMPUTER 

Mm. Apple. A^, CwnrnDtfo/e 5^, t8M. 
It 99I4A. Tintfi-Sincltir. TftS-60. WC-PD 







ATARI: 
BUBBLE SOfTT 


1 4l9^9^SSQ^^HflSBj 



The Making of a 

CHIP 




the fun and challenging 
world of computers 

Now from the people who brought you SESAME STREET, 
THE ELECTRIC COMPANY, and 3-2-1 CONTACT comes 
ENTER, the magazine that is as exciting as computers them- 
selves. There is news about computers, video games and 
everything from lasers to robots— plus puzzles, board games, 
quizzes and other features that make learning about compu- 
ters easy and fun. You won't want to miss an issue. So order 
your subscription now. 

Parents will love ENTER too. It'll explain why computers 
are such an important part of everyone's future. 




Subscription Order Form 

n Yes! Please send 1 year (10 issues) of ENTER for only $12.95 
D Payment enclosed D Bill me later 



CHILD'S NAME 



AGE 



ADDRESS 



CITY STATE 

LIST BILLING NAME AND ADDRESS IF DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE 



ZIP 



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CITY 



STATE 



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Subscription to Canada and other countries, add $8.00 per year. Please remit in U.S. currency- 
Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. 4HETfl 




NEW COMPUTER 
GAMES 



BYPHILWISWELLAND 
BERNIEDEKOVEN 



♦♦♦ 



THE CASTLES OF 
DOCTOR CREEP 

(Brgderbund. Commodore 64, $29.95) 

Doctor Creep is a busy, nasty 
fellow. He's got 13 castles, each 
with a different arrangement of 




puzzling rooms to guard. 
There are more than 200 rooms, 
and they're all like mazes, consist- 
ing of ladders, sliding poles, and 
walkways that lead to doors and 
on to other rooms. 

Of course, each room has its 
pitfalls, too. Some are guarded by 
the minions of Doctor Creep; oth- 
ers by secret traps and diff icult- 
to-negotiate pathways. 

Your character is not in search 
of treasures, a kidnapped prin- 
cess or magical powers. 
In fact, he is in search of just one 



thing: the door leading out of the 
castle. But to reach it, you need to 
open many other doors with color- 
coded keys. The castles are con- 
structed to give you the maximum 
runaround. This game takes some 
clever thinking. 

There's one aspect of Dr. Creep 
that really makes us stand up and 
cheer. The castles can be ex- 
plored by two players at the same 
time, making it a cooperative 
game that is even more fun than 
the one-player version. 
WRAP-UP 
PHIL: My only complaint about 
this game is the noticeable lack of 
sound effects, evidently traded off 
for the wonderful graphics and 
number of rooms to explore. 
BERNIE: I was impressed by the 
tutorial game and the great variety 
of options you get on the main 
menu. The two-player game is the 
best. 



♦ #♦ 



SKYFOX 



(Electronic Arts, Apple II. $40) 

This flight/battle simulator is by 
far the best in its category. It ad- 
vances state-of-the-art graphics 
on the Apple to a level you have to 
see to believe. Your view is from 
the cockpit of the jet fighter Sky- 
fox. The scrolling action of the 
ground and air scenery and of the 
enemy tanks, assault jets, and 
motherships is good enough to 
make the hair on Clint Eastwood's 
neck stand up. 

Your joystick controls diving, 
climbing, banking to either side, 
and firing of the gun and heat- 



seeking missiles. Other features 
of the jetcraft are available by 
tapping on the keyboard. For ex- 
ample, a nifty computer screen 
opens like a "window" over your 
view when you press "C. " This 
computer will locate enemies on a 
grid and identify their distance 
from both you and your base, 
which must be protected at all 
costs. Pressing ''A" puts the jet on 
autopilot. 

There are half a dozen instru- 
ments to monitor while you 
dogfight jets and tanks, but it isn't 
complicated to fly For one thing, 
you can't crash into the mountains 
or the desert floor — no matter 
how hard you try. The game just 




allows you to concentrate on the 
battles at hand. 

WRAP-UP 
BERNIE: Fifteen scenarios and five 
skill levels add lots of variety to 
Skyfox, and open it to a wide 
range of players. 

The graphics will literally make 
your mouth drop open. 
PHIL: Beautiful, yes. Still, it's just a 
shoot-em-up, a concept that is 
both violent and plotless. I guess 
I'm just tired of shooting games. 

(Continued on page 44) 



42 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



^ t 



JSNOT A SOU) spom: 





When we introduced Pitstop, 
we created action in the pits. 
Now, with PITSTOP 11, EPYX 
introduces true competitive auto 
racing, both on the track and in 
the pits. Auto racing is not a one 
man sport. With PITSTOP II, 
you can now experience the thrill 
of speed and competition as you battle your opponent in 
a race against the clock. Now, more than ever, the strategy 
of when you make a pit stop and your pit crew's speed 
and performance, combined with your skill on the track, 
will determine the winner. 
A split screen shows you your position and that of your 




opponent, a digital clock displays time and a lap 
counter gives you your race position as you race 
against each other in pursuit of the checkered flag. 
You can also play against the computer or take a 
few practice laps as you prepare for the real head- 
to-head competition. Step up to PITSTOP II because 
auto racing is not a solo sport. 
One or two players: Joystick controlled; disk or cassette. 




T coMfvra sarnvwe 

Strategy Games for the ActtonGame Player 




USER^JEWS 



(Continued from page 42) 



♦♦♦ 



IMPOSSIBLI MISSION 



(Epyx, Commodore 64, $39.95; Apple 
version planned) 




Here you control a beautifully 
detailed and animated secret 
agent in a maze of 32 rooms 
connected by elevator stiafts and 
tunnels, As in Doctor Creep, each 
room presents a unique set of 
problems, However, these rooms 
are solved by good joystick play 
more often than by logic. 

A "typical" room contains plat- 
forms suspended in the air, lifts 
that carry your agent up and 
down, pieces of furniture, robot 
guards, two exits, and several 
computer terminals. Each piece 
of furniture is hiding one of three 
things: a code word allowing you 
to freeze the guards , a piece 
of the master puzzle, or nothing. 

The object of the game is to 
gather enough clues to solve the 
master puzzle. You have tools for 
flipping the pieces, recoloring 
them to match others, and even a 
telephone line to a central com- 
puter that can give you the correct 
orientation for any piece. 

WRAP-UP 
BERNIE: The combination of ad- 
dictive arcade-like action and 
puzzle-solving strategy makes 
impossibie Mission the best 



game of its type I've seen this 
year 

PHIL: I can't agree more. Every- 
thing from sound effects to game 
logic to graphics is very well 
done. And you'll be thrilled to 
watch your agent not only run and 
jump, but actually somersault in 
mid-air at the touch of the action 
button. Don't miss this game. 

♦♦♦ 

TOY BIZARRE 

(Activision, Commodore 64, disk and 

cartridge, Atari home computers and 5200 

game systems, ColecoVision; $3195 disk, 

$34.95 cartridge) 

This action game has you cap- 
turing toys in a toy factory. The 
screen is an obstacle course of 
walkways that wrap around the 
screen left and right. You capture 
toy helicopters by jumping over 
them twice, and balloons by 
touching them. Your character 
can easily jump to the screen's 
various levels with a press of the 
action button and a bit of steering. 
In order to pass from screen to 
screen, you have to turn off 
special valves by passing through 
them in order. 

Unfortunately, you also have to 
contend with Hefty Hilda, a wind- 
up doll who chases you around 



:a* 


■■§■■■1 i 


■■■ w 


•3|« 


OFF* 


® 


X 



the factory. Avoid Hilda at all 
costs. And try to send her into 
orbit by jumping on one end of a 
platform when she is at the other 
end. It's lots of fun! 

WRAP-UP 
PHfL: You might call Toy Bizarre a 
maze game, because you need to 
learn a different pattern for each 
of its many screens. 
BERNIE: But it doesn't feel like a 
regular old maze game. It's afresh 
approach to a familiar idea. The 
graphics, sound and bonus 
rounds were very nicely done. 
This game is more than cute; it's 
also worthy of attention. 
♦♦♦ 

C OMPUTER DIPLOMAC Y 

(Avalon Hill Microcomputer Games, 
IBM PC, $50) 




This Diplomacy is a computer 
version of the classic board 
game. Up to seven players take 
control of the major European 
powers of 1901. Through military 
strategy and diplomatic alliances, 
treaties, deals, double-crosses, 
and betrayals, each player tries to 
gain control of a majority of supply 
centers. 

Computerized Diplomacy is a 
challenging game, but it's only 
available to a limited audience. If 
you haven't got an IBM PC with 
256K RAM, you can't play That's a 
shame. 

WRAP-UP 
PHIL: This game is best played 

(Continued on page 46) 



44 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1965 









:f»<-^ 




The hottest craze in the U.S. this fall 
is Breakdancing, and you don't have to 
miss it. Now anyone can Breakdance. Just 
grab your joystick and control your 
Breakdancer in poppin, moon walking, 
stretching and breaking... all on your 
computer screen. 

Breakdance, the game, includes an 
action game in which your dancer tries 
to break through a gang of Breakers 
descending on him, a "simon like" game 
where the dancer has to duplicate the 
steps of the computer-controlled dancer 
and the free-dance segment where you 
develop your own dance routines and the 



computer plays them back for you to see. 
There's even a game that challenges you 
to figure out the right sequence of steps to 
perform a backspm, suicide or other 
moves without getting "wacked'.' 

Learn to Breakdance today! Epyx 
maJkes it easy! 

One or two players; joystick controlled. 



epyx 

Strategy Games for tneAcUon-Game Player 





UserYiews 



(Continue(i from page 44) 

with all seven players, and it takes 
at least four or five hours to play. 
BEBNIE: This is one of Avalon Hill's 
best technical efforts. Everything 
works fine except the map. It 
scrolls well enough, but you can't 
get a decent overview of Europe. 
♦♦♦ 

ROBOTS OF DAWN 

(Epyx, Commodore 64 and Apple II. 
$39.95) 

This is an all-text adventure 
based on the best-selling science 
fiction novel of the same name by 
Isaac Asimov. A murder mystery 
involving humans and robots, it 
takes place on the planet Aurora. 
You are the Earth's most famous 
detective, Elijah Baley You've 
been called in on the case, even 
though Aurorans despise Earthl- 
ings. You will have to be very 
clever just to remain on the planet 
for long. 

We don't want to give away 
much of the plot. Suffice it to say 
that one of your first acts on Au- 



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rora is to find your robotic pal, 
Daneel. This robot helps you lo- 
cate the other things you need, 
and even interpret their uses. 

Although the sentence parser is 
not as sophisticated as in 
Infocom's games, the text is good. 



WRAP-UP 
BERNIE: Daneel is a lot of help. He 
has a tape recorder and can play 
back any of the conversations 
you held with suspects. I had a lot 
of fun playing Robots of Dawn. 
PHIL: Playing with robots is just 
good, imaginative fun. And 
it's easier to solve than most In- 
focom games. 

♦♦♦ 

STAR TREK 

(Coleco. Colecovision arid Adam, $30) 



smtLO 

HARP 















The screen display for this 
shoo!-em-up in space is divided 
into three areas. The top two- 
thirds of the screen show your 
score and the status of shields, 
photons, and warp energy You 
also get a radar "top view" that 
shows the positions of Klingon 
ships, starbases, and the Enter- 
prise (that's you). The bottom third 
of the screen shows Klingon ships 
racing in and out of view. 

Unfortunately, this space is too 
small to adequately display the 
action. You end up watching the 
radar display, which is something 
like a crude game of "Tank." You 
shoot. You move. They move. They 
shoot back. 

WRAP-UP 
PHIL: Yeccccchhhhhh! That's all I 
can say about Star Trek. 
BERNIE: Well, it's a little bit better 
than that. 



♦♦♦ 



CHAMPIONSHIP 
LODE RUNNER 

(Br0derbund; Apple II, Commodore 64, 
$34.95) 

If you were challenged by Lode 
Runner, then get ready to be dou- 
bly dared by this tougher version. 
It's easy to figure out how it works 
from the picture. You run around 
the maze and dig holes in the 
brick floors. The object? To trap 
guards long enough to collect all 
the gold chests and advance to 
the next screen. 

Actually, it isn't that simple. 
Lode Runner had 150 screens 
ranging from easy to difficult. 
Ctiampionship Lode Runner has 
only 50 screens, but they range 
from very difficult to obnoxiously 
difficult. These joystick puzzles 
have no mercy One false step 
and you've "bought the farm." 

If you buy this game, don't say 
we didn't warn you — it's tough. 

WRAP-UP 
BERNIE: Talk about tough! Even 
the hint book that diagrams at 




'a-JJ..I.I.I.I...I.M»IJII...lM»'J<>W.ri 



least a partial solution to all 50 
screens didn't help me very 
much. You really have to be willing 
to work at this game. 
PHIL: I have spent an awful lot of 
time this past month playing 
Championship Lode Runner. 
I'm still working on screen 12! H 



46 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



TRED OF WAIiniG HNIEVER 

STOUMD? 



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INTRODUCING THE FAST lOAD 
CARTRIDGE FROM EPYX. 

You're tired of waiting forever for your Commodore 64 
programs to load. But it's no use glaring at your disk 
drive. Calling it names won't help, either. It was born 
slow — a lumbering hippo. You need the FAST LOAD 
CARTRIDGE from EPYX. FAST LOAD transforms 
your Commodore 64 disk drive from a lumbering hippo 
into a leaping gazelle. With FAST LOAD, programs 
that once took minutes to load are booted up in a matter 
of seconds. 

FAST LOAD can load, save and copy your disks five 
times faster than normal. It plugs into the cartridge port 



of your Commodore 64 and goes to work automatically, 
loading your disks with ease. And that's only the 
beginning. You can copy a single file, copy the whole 
disk, send disk commands, and even list directories 
without erasing programs stored in memory. 

And unlike other products, the FAST LOAD 
CARTRIDGE works with most programs, even copy 
protected ones, including the most popular computer 
games. 

The FAST LOAD CARTRIDGE from Epyx. Easy 
to insert, easy to use and five times faster. So why 
waste time waiting for your disks to load? 

Speed them up with FAST LOAD! '^' 





Ep/X. 



rF£ri. 



'Software Scanner 



BYHILDEWEISERT 

a no 



REiM 



(Synapse, Combined Atari/ Commodore 

version. $99.95: Apple II, IBM PC 

and PCjr version $139.95. 

Optional worl<bQok, $9.95) 

You've had a rough day. Not 

only did you miss the bus, flunk 
an algebra test, and step in a mud 




puddle, but you've just discov- 
ered that you're locked out of your 
house. 

Sounds like you need to Relax. 

Like Calmpute, reviewed last 
nnonth, Relax is designed to help 
you learn "stress reduction." It has 
the same basic parts: A sensor 
plugs into your joystick port and 
physically measures your level of 
relaxation. A software program 
charts that level on the screen. 
With this "biofeedback," you can 
learn to lower your graph — and 
your tension. Another program on 
the disk projects colored patterns 
that change as you calm down. 



And then there's a game, where 
you win by mellowing out. 

Does it work? Also like Calm- 
pute, maybe. But only if you use it, 
and keep using it. So it had better 
be fun and simple to use. 

The good news is that Relax's 
relaxation audiotape is good. But 
this program does have some 
drawbacks— like the dull soft- 
ware. And for me, its sensor — a 
headband to pick up forehead 
tension — was harder to use than 
Ca/mpufe's fingertip device. I 
thought the manual was too short 
and too general to help much 
with your practice. 

Stress reduction programs 
aren't cheap, so make sure that 
you test the program before you 
buy it. 



-ann- 



INCREDIBLE MUSIC 
KEYBOARD 

(with software, keyboard and disk, 
$49.95) 

MUSIC PROCESSOR 

(disk, $34.95) 

3001 .SOUND ODYSSEY 

(disk. $39.95) 

(All tfiree released by Sigtil and Sound for 

Commodore 64) 

The latest thing in music pack- 
ages for the Commodore is an 
add-on piano-type keyboard with 
software to play or record with. 
One of the best is Sight and 
Sound's Incredible l^usic Key- 



board. This keyboard can be 
used by itself, but it also plugs 
you into Sight and Sound's line of 
music software. 

The Incredible Music Keyboard 
is a sturdy plastic overlay that 
puts two octaves of piano keys 
over the top of your C-64 key- 
board. The disk it comes with lets 
you pfay the keyboard just like a 
piano, except you can make the 
piano sound a hundred different 
ways. Two song books give you 




48 



ENTER 



sheet music for 51 songs— some 
duds and some hits. Key stickers 
make playing easy, even if you 
don't read music. I liked being 
able to play three-note chords 
and add weird special effects. 

One thing that you can't do with 
Incredible Keyboard is save tunes 
and play them back. To do that, 
you need the separate Music Pro- 
cessor disk. Music Processor lets 
you go from doodling around to 
actually writing and editing com- 
plex music programs. 

But what makes Music Proces- 
sor really fun are its seven music 
processing modes. For example, 
"Edit" lets you enter a song, then 
add lyrics that dance across the 
screen. The editing features are 
all easy to use, but very powerful. 
You can write, change and de- 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY1985 



■XJ£7£T 



bug fancy three-track song pro- 
grams without knowing 
programming, After you save your 
compositions on a disk, try the 
"Jukebox" mode. You can pro- 
gram the order of song play- 
back — just like a jukebox. 

One complaint: Although you 
can enter music with the MK, you 
have to take the keyboard off to 
key in some editing commands. 

Sight and Sound's other pro- 
grams include "albums" right off 
today's charts [Video Hits. On 
Stage). These albums are like 
the presets on Music Processor, 
only hipper. I played along with 
"Thriller," and made it even 
spookier with special effects (in- 
cluding my singing). 

3001: Sound Odyssey was my 
favorite program. 3001 is an off- 
beat synthesizer-composer 
package. Its excellent tutorial will 
teach you not only how a synthe- 
sizer works, but how nnusic works. 

If you're looking for software 
that will let you feel like an MTV 
star, the Incredible Music Key- 
board could be your entry into the 
musical software bag. 

£7£7£y 

SKIWRITERlf 

(Prentice-Hall: Commodore 64 and IBM 

PCjr, carlridge, $69.95; advanced IBM PC 

and PCjr version, disk, $99.00) 



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If our October issue made 
you dream about "Life On-Line," 
SkiWriter II may make your dream 



come true. On one ROM cartridge, 
you get a solid word-processing 
and "communications terminal" 
program. 

SkiWriter II is a pleasure to use: 
simple, powerful, and fast. With a 
telephone modem and this first- 
ever software combo, you can 
write a letter, edit it, and send it to 
a friend. You can "download" (re- 
ceive) text, format and print it. 
Easily! 

With SkiWriter It's editing fea- 
tures, writing is a breeze. After 
only a minute to check out the 
plastic template around the func- 
tion keys, SW II could mark, move, 
or cut out blocks of text; find and 
replace words and phrases; and 
zap all around my file. 

There are lots of format and 
print options. A handy "Preview" 
feature lets you see just what they 
look like before you print. 

With the terminal program, 
you'll feel like a pro your first time 
out. And it even keeps track of 
how long you're on line. Start-up, 
modem use, and details are well 
covered in a 48-page manual. 
And you can get on-screen help 
if you need it. 

Commodore and PCjr users, 
stand up and cheer: SkiWriter II is 
a cartridge, You don't need a 
disk drive. It loads instantly. But 
watch out! You'll never be able to 
use the old homework excuse, 
"The dog ate my software." Car- 
tridges are tough. 

C!a£J 

STATES AND TRAITS 

(DesignWare; Commodore 64, Apple II 
and IBM PC; disk. $44.95) 

Usually geography's about as 
much fun as scrubbing the kitch- 
en floor with a toothbrush. 

But— honest!— here's a game 



that can make learning all about 
U.S. geography and state facts 
("traits") a fact-filled, fun-filled 





In Mhkch 

11 the 

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challenge. 

States and Traits is really three 
different games. All of them are 
enjoyable and engaging for one 
or two players. 

In the first game, you use your 
joystick or cursor keys to move 
outlined states to where they be- 
long on the map. Match them 
correctly, and the state gets col- 
ored in — and you get points. But 
drop Illinois where Nevada should 
go, and the program corrects you, 
then deducts points, When the 
game's over, it lists the states 
that you missed and tallies up 
your score. 

In the second game, you match 
states with questions about cap- 
itals, current and historic facts, 
border states and land forms. 
Feeling unsure of your U,S, knowl- 
edge? You can bone up in ad- 
vance by using the "Review" 
option. 

The section I liked best was 
"Make your own game." Here, you 
write your own questions. This is 
a great way to study for social 
studies or make up family trivia 
quizzes, 

Sfa(es and Traits should still be 
fun long after you've memorized 
the capitals of Iowa, Indiana and 
Idaho, S 



HILDE WBSERI is an educational consul- 
tant and treelance writer 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



49 



V 

THE INCREDIBLE 

FiyiNG CAMEBA 



Fou've seen the view from 
high above a football 
stadium before. But have 
you ever fiown through the 
goalposts like a football? 
Be prepared to fly with Skycam, 
a computerized camera that soars 
through the air on steel cables. 
Skycam, which was used at several 
pro football games this year, has 
been a hit in its first high-flying 
performances. It may be used at 
this month's Super Bowl game. 
And, if all continues to go well, you 
can expect to see a lot more of 
Skycam during 1985. Plans call for 
its use at soccer matches, skiing 
and other sporting events, and in 
the making of movies, television 
commercials, and even music 
videos. 

"It gives us almost more freedom 
than we know what to do with," 
says Skycam's inventor, Garrett 
Brown. His flying camera can follow 
a sprinting receiver downfield, 
hurtle off the edge of a ski jump, or 
hover above an ice skater per- 
forming a spinning dance 



BY DOUG G A R R 

COMPUTERIZED 

SKYCAM BRINGS NEW 

VIEWS TO SPORTS 

COVERAGE 



Even TV cameras mounted in a 
blimp can't do that. 

LfARNINGTOFLY 



"The wonderful thing about 
Skycam," says Garrett, "is that it 
lets you put a lens where no 
camera could ever go before." 
Garrett, 42, is a cameraman and 
computer technician whose 
inventions have already hit the 
mark at the movies. In 1978, he won 
an Oscar for inventing the 
Steadicam, a camera that remains 
steady while camera operators run, 
jump and move around. This 
invention helped create special 
effects in movies like Return of the 
Jedi, where it was used to film the 
forest chase sequence. 

Garrett's newest invention is a 
complicated system. Skycam's 



50 



ENTER 



lightweight camera glides on a set 
of heavy-duty steel cables 
attached to four points around a 
stadium or other arena. These 
cables, connected to four 
microprocessor-controlled mo- 
tors, move the camera through 
the air. The whole system is 
controlled with a Sage micro- 
computer and two joysticks. The 
Skycam unit weighs around 30 
pounds, and can travel through the 
air at a speed of 25 MPH. 

HOW SKYCAM FUES 

Two pilots (or operators) are 
needed to work Skycam. One pilot 
uses a joystick to control the way 
the camera flies. The other 
operator controls what Skycam will 
film. This pilot uses another joystick 
to turn the camera left and hght, up 
and down, and to focus, zoom, and 
pan the lens. "It's (ike playing a two- 
handed video game," says Larry 
Cone, who helped write the soft- 
ware that controls Skycam. 

The Sage microcomputer used 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 





to control Skycam is not that 
different from a regular home 
computer it has 256K bytes of 
Random Access Memory— which 
was actually more than the pro- 
grammers needed- The Sage is 
programmed in FORTH, an 
advanced language that uses five 
times fewer commands than BASIC. 

Skycam's computer program 
doesn't just control camera move- 
ments. It also lets operators store a 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



S 



kycam soars into 

action—taking 

you wliere no 

camera has ever 

gone before. 




particular camera angle in the 
machine's memory. Once a series 
of joystick movements has been 
recorded into the computer, these 
movements can be repeated by 
simply pressing a button. 

The picture from the Skycam 
camera travels by audio-video 
microwave signal back to the ground 
crew. In a split second, this signal 
is sent along fiber optic cables 
to a camera truck. From there it is 



ENTER 



51 




transmitted to your TV set. 
COOKING UP AN INVENTION 

Skycam didn't just come out of 
thin air. Brown got the idea about 
five years ago wliile filming an 
episode of (he TV series Little 
House on the Prairie. He was 
talking with Merlin Olsen, the actor 
and former football star, about how 
it was impossible to get certain 
camera angles. This conversation 
stuck with Garrett, but two years 
passed before he had a chance to 
start developing Skycam. His first 
efforts were simple, but they proved 
to him that a "flying camera" 
system could be built. 

"I tried the theory out in my 
kitchen." Garrett recalls. "I used 
sewing thread and a quarter-inch 
bolt. It was suspended from a 
microwave oven, the sink, the 
kitchen door, and the refrigerator 
handle." By raising and lowering 
the different pieces of thread, 
Garrett discovered he could move 
the bolt {"camera') to just about 
any position he wanted. Soon after, 
he formed a company named 
Skywofks, and raised enough 
money to build and test a prototype. 

Garrett tested Skycam at a high 
school athletic field, and then at 
Veteran's Stadium in Philadelphia. 
But those first tests weren't exactly 
a field day All kinds of things went 
wrong. During one test, the camera 
seemed to have a mind of its own. It 
flew everywhere but where Garrett 
wanted it to. A programmer had 
misplaced one number in the 
Skycam operating program, and it 
took all afternoon to find that tiny 
error. Meanwhile, Garrett recalls, 
"Yours truly succeeded in crashing 
the prototype." 




uarrettBrown 

(above) ''cooked up" 

the first Skycam in 

iiis kitclien. 



^ 



52 



Other problems, including 
difficulty getting all the equip- 
ment and cables at the right time, 
kept Garrett and the Skyworks 
team behind schedule. The first 
working model of Skycam was 
supposed to be ready for the 
February 1984 Winter Olympics. 
But bugs in the system kept the 
Skyworks team from unveiling 
Skycam during the Winter or 
Summer Olympic Games. 

Brown's team also tried using a 
Skycam prototype in early 1984 
during the making of Robert 
Bedford's baseball film. The 
Natural. Radford wanted Skycam to 
follow the flight of a home run. But 
the frame that held the camera 
wasn't solid enough. The picture 

ENTER 



jiggled and the film footage 
couldn't be used. The new version 
of Skycam has a sturdier frame. 

Even with the new improved 
Skycam, a looming problem 
remains: all that equipment hang- 
ing in mid-air could get in the way, 
especially during football games 
when there's a high kick or pass. 

"Precautions have been taken," 
says Garrett. The National Football 
League (NFL) has already set up 
rules that affect where and how 
Skycam can be used during a 
game. For instance, if the camera 
is positioned behind the quarter- 
back, Skycam must be 20 feet 
above the ground. If the camera is 
over the line of scrimmage, it must 
be at least 50 feet off the ground. 
And if it is over the defensive team, 
it must be 75 feet above (he field. 

"You don't want a ballplayer 
seeing the ball and the camera 
approaching at (he same time," 
says Garrett. "You don't want him 
trying to catch the wrong one." 

Some further testing has to be 
done before the NFL will approve 
Skycam for use during the Super 
Bowl. But, in the meantime, you can 
look for Skycam's unique point-of- 
view in an upcoming Billy Squier 
music video and a Cyndi Lauper 
concert video, in a Lionel Richie 
commercial for Coca-Cola, in 
movies like A Chorus Line, and in 
other sporting events. 

How will you know if it's really 
Skycam? 

Well, if you're watching TV and 
the scene on the screen has you 
zooming through the air, you'll 
know Skycam is at work. 

You'll know, that is, if you can see 
with your hands over your eyes! S 



DOUG GARR is a freelance writer 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 







L 



ne of these days, they'll 
come up with a camera 
an inch long, and we'll 
stick ft on the football," says Chet 
Forte, director of ABC-TV's Monday 
Night Football. 

That day may be here soon. 
Microchip technology is already 
making cameras, microphones 
and other broadcast tools smaller 
than ever And TV is using this 
technology to give sports coverage 
a new look. Whether scanning the 
field from a Skycam-point-of-view. 
or watching a big catch on instant 
replay, computers are there, putting 
you into the action. 

"In the last five years, sports 
television has been taken over by 
computers," says Dwight Morris of 
CBS Engineering Department. 
"Every major piece of equipment 
has microprocessors in it." 

Computers in the control room let 
directors know instantly what's 
happening with the dozens of 
cameras, monitors and videotape 
machines used to cover a sports 
event. Staying on top of the action 
is crucial. For instance, when a 30- 
yard touchdown pass is tossed 
down the sideline, the director can 
check a computer console to tell 
which camera picked up the 
action. Then, using the computer 
built into a videotape machine like 
the Sony 2000, the director can 
replay the action instantly. 

Computer technology has also 
changed the TV camera. "In the old 
days, we had to fine^une cameras 
manually," says NBC cameraman 
Lenny Basile. "Now they're 
computerized. We can go in tighter 




Madden: Master of ttie chalkboard 

and go out wider more easily" But, 
Basile insists, machinesalone can't 
do the work: "A cameraman is like 
a ballplayer If he's a good hitter, 
he's a good hitter no matter what, A 
good cameraman makes any 
equipment work." 

One of the best "hitters" when it 
comes to using new technology is 
CBS announcer John Madden. 
John, a former football coach, is a 
master with a device called a 
telestrator— better known as the 
CBS chalkboard. 

The chalkboard lets John draw 
play patterns right on the screen. 
It's not new; telestrators have been 
around for almost 10 years. But, 
says CBS executive producer Terry 
O'Neil, "There was no one with 
John's level of sophistication 
holding the stylus.,.. After 20 
years of coaching, he's used to talk- 
ing and writing at the same time." 

When Madden uses the 
chalkboard, the control room calls 
up the play on a videotape 
machine. The play is then shown in 
a freeze-frame on a special monitor 
in the announcers' booth. As 
Madden draws on the monitor, the 



stylus works like a light pen. It 
creates lines that are 
superimposed onto your TV 
screen. When John is done, he 
presses a button to erase the lines. 
That signals the videotape to roll- 
TV football coverage may be 
the biggest innovator but it isn't . 
the only sport getting a new look: 

• At the 1983 Daytona 500, a 
microchip-run camera and 
microphone let viewers go along 
for the ride in the winning car 

• At the New York and Boston 
Marathons, camera crews use an 
electric truck to ride in front of the 
runners. This gives viewers a close- 
up view without spewing gasfumes. 

• At the Belmont Stakes horse 
race, a mini-camera is mounted in 
the gate so you can see the start of 
the race from the rider's seat. 

What's next? TV experts like 
producer Tony Verna predict we 
may soon have electronic signal 
seeds implanted in footballs and 
baseballs. These seeds will let 
cameras follow the action 
instantaneously And someday, tiny 
cameras in the quarterback's 
helmet might show how the field 
looks before the ball is snapped. 

Some sport experts worry about 
all this technology "Sometimes we 
overdo it," says Beano Cook, ABC's 
college football analyst. "In this 
business, when you get a new toy, 
everybody wants to play with it. All 
this technology can detract from 
the telecast." But even Cook admits 
there's one machine he'd like to 
see: "The technology everybody 
wants is a computer that tells you 
who is going to win." B 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



53 




RATING THE TOP COLLEGE S.A. T PROGRAMS 



BY CAROLYN J. MULLINS AND ROBERT C. MULLINS 



/f I've gotta study, I'd rather 
do it on a computer," says 
Rob, nny son. He prefers 
sports to books. But he also wants 
the best scores he can get on the 
college boards — otherwise known 
as the SATs (Scholastic Aptitude 
Tests). Fortunately, there's comput- 
er software available thai prom- 
ises to help him study for the SATs. 

This software is aimed at 14-, 15- 
and 16-year-olds who will soon be 
taking the PSATs or SATS. But even 
if you're not planning to take the 
SATs for a few years, these 
programs can help you build vo- 
cabulary, sharpen math skills, and 
strengthen writing skills. 

As you'll see, there's a lot to 
choose from. WeVe tried to show 
each program's strong and weak 
points. In the spirit of schooling, 
we've given each a grade. If we 



disagree, we'll tell you. 

ACI (American College Testing Pfogram, 
$180; three d/ste and one manual.) 

The designers of this program 
believe that test simulations aren't 
accurate and may not help you 
learn. So, instead of simulations, 
they offer a review of common mis- 
takes and ways to avoid these mis- 
takes. When the review is over, the 
questioning begins. Whether you 
answer right or wrong, you get an 
explanation of the correct answer. 

We liked the way this program 
divides topics. For instance, the 
math section is divided into basic 
algebra, geometry problems, etc. 
This strategy helps you zero in on 
what you want to study most. 
Unfortunately, the program doesn't 
store your results. 

GRADE: A - 



College Board SAT (Kreii. $300: 
six disks and a manual.) 

Krell software's strong points 
include an automatic learning 
feature that tracks your progress 
and then generates specially- 
tailored questions to help you with 
problem areas. 

Rob and I also liked this program's 
randomization feature. Each time 
you take a test, you get slightly dif- 
ferent questions in a different order. 

Best of all, Krell promises to 
refund your money if you use their 
software for at least six hours and 
don't improve total SAT results at 
least 70 points over your previous 
score. "This program needs some 
simulated tests like Mastering the 
SAT." says Rob. "Still, using it is 
more interesting than using most of 
the other programs." 

MY GRADE: B + ; ROB'S GRADE: C 



54 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 




FT W ARE ROUND-UP 




Computer SAT (Harcourl. Brace 
Jovanovich, $80; lour lull- length exams, 
540 drill Hems, and 1000 electronic, 
vocabulary-building llashcards.) 

Computer SAT's flashcards 
earned Rob's highest praise — 
"Awesome!" 

"Unfortunately," he adds, "the 
pre-test isn't so hot," This pro- 
gram's questions come from a 
worl<bool<. You type the answers in 
an on-screen test sheet, 

"You don't need a computer for 
this," Rob groused. "It's faster to 
answer on paper, then check with 
an answer sheet," After you finish 
plugging the answers into the 
computer, the program figures a 
score, and designs a personal 
study plan. This program isn't fun, 
but it gives you a comprehensive 
study tool at a reasonable price. 
GRADE: B- 

Computer Study Program for the 

SAT (Barron's $%; Two workbool<s, one 
textbook, one manual, and three double- 
sided disks) 

This package has four full-length 
practice tests, and gives you feed- 
back on each question. It also 
offers timed tests, and suggests 
lessons based on your score. 

However, the Computer Study 
Program uses questions in a book 
instead of on a disk. We think that's 
a pretty dull way to use a computer. 
"You get confused switching from 
question to question, from com- 
puter to book and back," Rob says. 

GRADE: C-h 

Improving College Admissions 
Test Scores (NASSf^$l84: seven 
disks and one manual.) 

Whether your answer is right or 
wrong, this program offers encour- 
agement. If you get the right 



answer, the word "Correct" flashes 
diagonally across the screen. If you 
make an error, the program offers 
hints and a detailed explanation of 
what you missed. 

We didn't like the screens in the 
verbal section because they 
seemed crowded. But the math 
section was Rob's favorite. It comes 
with on-screen graphics that help 
in problem-solving. For instance, 
one math question plots a path 
across two chunks of land at 
different heights. Simple graphs 
plot the possible answers. Even 25 
years away from trigonometry, I 
could start a problem without a 
clue and gradually figure out why, 
using these graphs- 

GRADES:A-math:B-\- verbal. 

Mastering the SAT (CBS and National 
Association ol Secondary School Principals, 
$150; One workbook and four disks.) 

We liked the fact that questions 
appear on screen and not in a book 
with this program. We also liked the 
way the program analyzes your 
performance after testing and goes 
over the answers with you. 

When you're reading a lot on the 
computer screen, it's important that 
the type is easy to read. The 
screens in this program are well 
done, with enough open space to 



C STflTCJEHT RB=I60H 

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Mastering the SAT gives sample tests. 



separate questions from answers. 

"The Test of Standard Written 
English is especially good," says 
Rob. "But I need more than two 
tests," 

Basically, this software is well- 
designed, has excellent tests and 
tips on test-taking. It can also store 
results for up to three people. But 
we'd have liked it better if it had 
had more practice tests and 
changed the order of questions 
when we retook a test. 

GRADE: A - 

Owlcat (DRI, $90; 15-hour course. 
1 manual, 4 disks; $250 lor 60-hour. 
9 disks and 4 manuals; $20 lor PSAT 
pretest, 1 manual and 1 disk.) 

I think Owlcat is a diamond in the 
rough; Rob doesn't, 

I think it offers many of the 
advantages of the Krell software, 
but at a lower cost. Rob is not 
convinced. 

The software features three 
modes: learning (with or without 
cheers for right answers), drill 
(questions and answers only), and 
review (questions, answers, 
explanations and a dictionary). 

There's also a game mode. But 
Rob didn't like this. "It just feeds 
you vocabulary words and asks for 
opposites, " he says. "If you get 
them right, it calls you 'a genius.' If 
you don't, it tells you 'even 
geniuses don't get everything 
right,'" 

Rob wasn't crazy about the 
vocabulary section, either. It only 
defines words, and then gives 
practice sentences. Over and over. 

GRADE: C- H 

CAROLYN MULUNS is a Ireelance writer in 
Virginia. ROB MULUNS 17, is a senior in 
high school. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



55 



▼AT" 



^Random ^ccess 



WITH FRIENDS UKE THESE. . . 




Friendly? If computers are user-friendly, then I'm Indiana Jones. 



BY CHARLES ARDAI, 14 



fverybody talks about 
computers and software 
being "user-friendly." But in 
all the time that I've been using 
computers (I started four years 
ago), I've never run across a 
friendly computer. No matter how 
costly or fancy they are, I've 
always found computers to be 
downright unfriendly. 

Tal<e almost any computer 
keyboard, for instance. Look at 
where the keys most likely to harm 
your program are placed. Have 
they thoughtfully been put some- 
where where you'll never hit them 
by mistake? No way Usually, 
they're directly below or above 
RETURN, or some other frequently- 
used key 

On my Commodore keyboard, 
the DELETE key is right next to 



HOME, the key that sends the 
cursor back to the beginning of a 
document. So, whenever I make a 
typing error {which happens a lot), 
I try to tap DELETE to erase it. 
Instead, I usually end up hitting 
HOME. I end up typing over 
everything I've already typed, 
iotafly ruining my document. 
Pretty annoying. 

It's not Commodore's fault; 
other computers are just as bad. 
The Atari 400 crams all of its most 
important and dangerous keys 
together in a tight little corner 
It's almost as if the computer is 
daring you— fry and hit the right 
key! And many other computers 
force you to memorize strange 
patterns, They require you to 
use the RETURN key for capital 
letters, and the FUNCTION key 
for symbols and numbers. This 
often requires greater finger 



coordination than any human 
could possibly have. So much for 
"easy-to-use" keyboards. 

Error messages also drive me 
crazy Why is it that so often they 
just don't make sense? "Syntax 
Error" and "Out of Memory Error" 
are okay, but what can you do 
when confronted by "Formula Too 
Complex Error" or even worse, 
"lntemalError#3541(a)-7?"lt's 
bad enough that your program 
doesn't work. You certainly don't 
need the computer to display 
some indecipherable message. 

That brings me to computer 
languages in general. Why do 
they have to be so weird? Even 
the simplest programming 
language, like BASIC, is difficult 
for a person with little computer 
experience to understand, You'd 
think that somewhere along the 
way, someone would invent a 
language for the computer that 
really is in English. 

And how about green screen 
monitors? They have to be one of 
the worst things to stare at for long 
periods of time. Try reading long 
programs off a green screen 
sometime. You'll probably end up 
with typographical errors and a 
splitting headache. And what 
looks good in glowing green, 
anyway? 

Don't get me wrong — 1 like 
computers. I've had fun with 
them, once i was able to figure out 
their quirks and habits. But as for 
user-friendliness— well, all I can 
say IS that dogs have nothing to 
worry about. The computer will 
never replace them as my best 
friend. g 



56 



ENTER 



Charles Ardai lives in New York City. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



0% 




"^%# 



MUNCHERS 



PERPLEXING 
PIXELS 

BY SUSAN JARREU. 

This screen filled with colors 
actually is a maze. Every pixel 
block is color-coded, telling you 
which direction to move in. To 



play, start at any square in the top 
row. Using the color key at right, 
maneuver your moves until you 
get to the "EXIT" pixel box. 

Be careful! The black boxes are 
bugs. Landing on one means 
you've got to start over. And be- 
ware of the endless loop, which 
will send you around and around 
and.. .well, you get the picture. 

(Answers on page 40) 




KEY 

BU\CK = Begin again! 

RED = Move one RIGHT 
GREEN = Move one LEFT 
BLUE = Move one DOWN 
YELLOW = MoveoneUP 











































































































































































































































































































. 




















































































































■ 


y 












■ 


■ 






EXIT 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



ENTER 



57 



A KATIE PARKER COMPUTER MYSTERY 



THE CASE OF THE 

CRYSTAL CAT 

BY DAVID BENSON POWELL 

— e%s 

CONCLUSION 



The story so far: A burglary ring has swept into Katie 
Parl<er's home town. Twenty homes have been broken into— 
including Katie's own. When Katie surprised the robbers, they 
left behind a small statue of a crystal cat. 

To track down the thieves, she used her computer to plot 
other Winter Harbor robbery sites and places where similar 
"gills" had been left behind. A complex pattern appeared. 
Katie and her best friend Don found two possible hideouts. 

That night, Katie and Don split up and went looking for the 
hideouts. Katie found an old larmhouse. She crouched behind 
a bush. She'd noted the license plates of two vans nearby 
when her digital watch alarm went off— a reminder to check 
with Don. But as Katie backed away, she stepped on the foot of 
a very big man. Will she escape? Find out here, in the 
conclusion of "The Case of the Crystal Cat." 




ell, well, what do we have here?" a 
voice snapped. It was the same voice 
Katie had hea^d in her house on the 
night of the rcoosry. Two huge hands 
grabbed her. Tiie man carried Katie 
under his arm loward the farmhouse. 

She bounced helplessly. 
"Hey Lex," her host shouted toward the house, 

"we've got a snoop." 
A door opened and Katie could see three men in the 

shadows. Two were holding up jewelry and arguing 

with the third--a man in a business suit. 
Katie was trying to think of a way out when she 

remembered a karate class she'd once taken. Tucked 

under this behemoth's arm, she was left with only one 

possible attack-^she could batter the guy's kneecaps. 

She doubted that would help. Then she remembered 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 ENTER 



the instructor's First Lesson of Self-Defense. It was 
simple: "If you can run run ! " 

"That won't help much now, but maybe later," she 
thought. Then she recalled the Second Lesson of Self- 
Defense: "If you can't run, use anything at hand." 

That seemed like good advice, but the only nearby 
object was a tree. As they went by the tree, Katie 
folded her knees toward her chest and then snapped 
her legs straight back out toward the tree trunk. Her 
heels hit so hard she rocketed out of the crook's arm. 

Now for Lesson One: "Run!" 

Katie ran through a field of tall weeds towards the 
woods. Two thieves were hot on her trail. She reached 
the woods and ducked behind a tree. Crouching low, 
she swiftly crept away toward a distant road. She kept 
an eye on the crooks in the field. They seemed to think 
she was still hiding there. 

"Crafty burglars, but lousy trackers." Katie thought 
as she crept along back toward town. A feeble light 
glided silently into view. Katie hid until she recognized 
Don, pedaling his bike toward the farmhouse to find 
his missing fhend. 

"Look kids," ShehffNewhouse pleaded, "I can't go 
bursting into old farmhouses to arrest people, simply 
on your say-so" He was playing with the pins marking 
robbery sites on his wall map as he spoke. "And what 
proof do I have they are the crooks?" 

The sheriff leveled a double-barreled stare at Katie. 
"Besides, let's say they are who you say They'll have 
moved to another hideout by now. So let me handle 
this." Newhouse settled in behind his desk, and said 
"I'll give those license-plate numbers and van descrip- 
tions to my officers, and we'll keep a lookout for them." 

The sheriff leaned back in his chair and sighed. 

(Continued on next page) 



59 



"Now if you kids had a crystal ball that could tell where 
the crooks will strike next, we might be able to do 
something. But these crooks are pros. That guy you 
saw in the business suit was probably their 'fence,' a 
buyer for their stolen goods, Those guys mean busi- 
ness, so no more night raids, OK?" 

Katie and Don nodded and left. 

"Funny," Newhouse mumbled, "I didn't hear a 'yes' in 
that nod." 

As they walked out, Katie chuckled. "I think New- 
house is about to start believing in crystal balls." 

"What?" said Don. 

" I think we really can predict the next robbery loca- 
tion with Sherlock's data." said Katie . 

"We've already gotten too close," Don said. 

ack at her house, Katie powered up 
I Sherlock while Don got critical sup- 
I plies— cookies and miik, Sherlock's 
screen filled with the map of Winter 
Harbor Katie replayed the robbery 
sites. The robbers hit one side of town, 
then the other 
"This is our crystal ball," Katie said. 
"I get it," Don answered while munching a cookie. 
"The robbers last hit the north end of town, then 
jumped south. ..then north and south again. And with 
every jump, they had moved a little further counter- 
clockwise," 

"Right," Katie agreed. "Sherlock can calculate how 
long their jumps usually are, and how much they 
usually shift. Then my trusty computer can predict the 
line for the next jump. That line should lead us straight 
to the next robbery." 

Katie turned to Don. "Give me a cookie, please." As 
she munched, she wrote a small program to take 
Sherlock's robbery data and predict the robbers' next 




move. By the time the cookies were half gone, Katie 
had finished. 

The line Sherlock predicted ended at York Road. 
Katie asked Don: "Do you remember how we double- 
checked those two hideout locations?" 

"We used the points where stolen loot — like the 
crystal cat — reappeared as gifts." 

"Right," she said, calling Sherlock's robbery data to 
the screen. "There were three robberies in the south 
part of town on Wednesday. Sherlock has shown that 
the loot tends to reappear three days later That means 
some should resurface tonight." 

Katie redisplayed the town map and plotted 
Wednesday's robberies. "These points are where stuff 
was taken Wednesday," she continued. "Now where 
might some of this loot appear tonight? According to 
Sherlock's data, stolen property reappears within four 
miles," said Katie. "So let's plot all the points four miles 
from Wednesday's robberies." She entered a few lines 
of code. A circle formed around each of three robbery 
sites. The circles overlapped around York Road. 

Katie grabbed a cookie and sat back in her chair, 
"Yes, I think Newhouse should checkout the York 
Road area tonight... don't you?" 

The next morning, Katie had to explain to Sheriff 
Newhouse how she came by her prediction before he 
would take her seriously. That wasn't easy, but New- 
house could see some truth in Sherlock's numbers. 
The Sheriff and Sergeant Molloy would patrol York 
Road that night, 

"Of course, they'll need help," Katie told Don after 
Newhouse and Molloy left, "They can't possibly cover 
the entire York Road area. I'll come over to your place 
tonight at eight." 

Don had hoped Katie would be late, but she 
arrived right on time. It was already dark. 

Don held a flashlight on Katie's street map while she 



W 



ith two crooks in pursuit, Katie ran to the woods and hid behind 
a tree. Usually, she didnt like the dark. Tonight it felt safe. 




,#»o. 






4>r '^^Z ^<?/f. "^V "^^A ^rA ■ 






^f 



Run For H" 

Weekly Reader 
Family Software 

A division of Xerox Education Publications 
Middlctown,CT 06457 



<^ g <;^ 





^^T^his is our crystal ball,* Katie said. She munched a cookie and 
J. wrote a program to help the computer predict the next robbery. 



traced out separate patrol routes for them. They split 
up. Several times, Katie spotted Newhouse and Molloy. 
She pulled off the road and hid. When they passed, 
she pedaled her bike silently down the street. Sud- 
denly, she heard a creaking sound coming from a 
nearby yard. 

There in the yard, blocked from view by a tool shed, 
was a dark-colored van. It was parked beside an unlit 
house. Katie tried to see the van's license plate. The 
tool shed was in the way. 

Katie checked her digital watch. This time, she 
made sure the watch's alarm wasn't on. Then she 
stared into a dark passage between the van and the 
house. Vague, dark shapes moved back and forth. 
"They must be loading up their loot," she thought. 
"They might be ready to leave." 

Katie had to see the license plate, to be absolutely 
sure they were the crooks. She crossed the yard and 
slipped inside the shed. Through a window, she could 
see the van's plate... It was them! 

The men got into the van, the engine revved up, and 
the van began to back down the driveway — right 
toward Katie's hiding place. She couldn't let them get 
away How could she stop them? 

Again, she recalled her karate instructor's words: 
"Use anything at hand..." 

In a tool shed, tools! She turned on her penlight, and 
played it around the shed's walls. She could make out 
a rake and a garden tiller. They each had long, sharp, 
metal teeth. Katie grabbed the tiller and rake, ran out 
behind the van and jammed their teeth under the rear 
tires. The metal teeth sank in with a soul-satisfying 
"hiss" of escaping air In seconds, the tires were flat. 
The van's doors flew open. Four angry men rushed out. 

Katie was already running down the driveway. 

"It's the snoop again!" one man shouted. "Get her!" 




62 



ENTER 



Four large bodies ran into the street after her. It 
wouldn't be long before they caught up, Katie needed 
help, but nobody was around, The men got closer 
Her only hope was to draw attention, 
"FREE ICE CREAM!". .."FREE ICE CREAM!",., she 
screamed all the way down the street. 

Doors and windows opened. People were shouting: 
"SHUT UR WILL YA?".., "CUT THE RACKET OR WE'LL 
CALL THE POLICE ! ", . ,"FREE ICE CREAM?, „ WHERE?" 

he once-quiet neighborhood was 
now bright and noisy People in street 
clothes and pajamas crowded excit- 
edly onto front lawns. The crooks 
stopped and stared around them. Be- 
fore they could run, two police 
cruisers— sirens blaring — squealed into the road from 
either end, Newhouse's car screeched to a halt near 
Molloy's — boxing the crooks neatly in between, 

Katie stopped. People and bright lights, cops and 
robbers filled the road. At the far end of the street, 
Don's single, weak bicycle headlight came into view. 
Katie sat on the curb to wait for him. 

The next morning, Katie and Don were summoned 
to Newhouse's office — no doubt, Katie thought, for a 
good chewing out. They knocked on the Sheriff's door 
A strained voice called them in. 

Sheriff Newhouse and Officer Molloy must have 
been sharing a great joke. Both were wide-eyed and 
red-faced. "'FREE ICE CREAM!'..." Newhouse laughed 
toward Katie. "How'd you ever think of that one?" 
"Well..." 

"I have to hand it to you, it certainly worked. We 
could hear you from four blocks away." 
"Five blocks here," Don added. 
"For years, we cops have been trying to get peoples' 

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



t.HiPP' 



Lwim 




G^M E . 



yf^'^.f 



esame Street Magazine- \, ^ 

ig Bird and his delightful ■'' - 

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i playful surprises, ten ' 

»rrlf Ic times a year. (It's ^ 

ie entertaining education that Sesame 

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atie put the tools behind the crook's van. In a second, the vans 
tires were flat and the four crooks took ojf after her. 



-e%3- 



attention with police whistles — when shouting 'FREE 
ICE CREAM!' would have worked even better." New- 
house said, still grinning. 

But then the Sheriff got a stern look on his face. "I 
thought I told you to stay out of this. You are very lucky 
that things went your way, Miss Parker. We have the 
crooks and their fence in custody.. .plus the stuff they'd 
taken from that last house." 

Katie was surprised. "I didn't think the fence was 
with them last night," she said. 

"He wasn't," Molloy broke in. "Wegot him later" 

"You see," Newhouse continued, "those gifts the 
crooks were leaving behind were the worthless items 



their fence wouldn't accept. The crooks couldn't keep 
that incriminating evidence around, so they left the 
'gifts' in other victims' homes." 

"That still doesn't explain how you nabbed the 
fence," Katie reminded them. 

"Oh, yeah," Newhouse said, "You can chalk that up 
to the old saying that there's no honor among thieves. 
When I told them that Katie— 'the snoop'— tracked 
them down using their fence's rejects, they were so 
mad , they turned him In, too .'" H 

DAVID B. POWELL is a writer who lives in Massachusetts arid 
specializes if} computers. Story © 1985, David B. Powell 



^3 FROM KATIE'S DOSSIER e^ 



I n "The Case of the Crystal Cat, " Katie caught a 
gang of burglars by analyzing their robberies and 
plotting their behavior To help her predict where 
they might strike next, Katie used her computer's 
word processing and screen graphics software. 

In real life, police departments have been using 
even more complicated programs to help them fight 
crime. They include the following: 

• CASS (Crime /Analysis System Support) gives 
detectives leads by analyzing criminals' behavior, 
and predicting where they might strike next. CASS 
has also helped fire departments track down 
arsonists, who also tend to follow strong patterns. 

• PATREC (Pattern Recognition) analyzes a police 
artist's sketch of a criminal, and pulls similar mug 
shots from police files. 

• CADS (Computer-^ided Dispatch System) 



dispatches officers fast. They can even arrive 
during a crime. 

• MICRONYMS stores and matches fingerprints. 

• CATCH (Computer-Assisted Terminal Criminal 
Arrest) helps catch crooks by scanning previous 
crime reports for likely suspects. 

But these programs will seem like toys when 
compared with "artificial intelligence" programs like 
AURA (Automated Reasoning Assistant). AURA 
almost seems to think and reason like a human. 
Already AURA has "thought through" problems in 
mathematics, computer design and nuclear safety, 
without "knowing" anything about these areas. 
Soon, AURA may be packaged in a personal, or 
even a pocket, computer Then, detectives in the 
field may be able to punch in their problems, and 
get the computer's instant suggestions. — D.B.P 



64 



ENTER 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 



YOUR COMMODORE 64 
CAN NOW USE STANDARD 

APPLE ll+HARDWARE 

AND SOFTWARE 



^ CSS C J)NtS SOPTWARfc TG PROL 

PRACTICAL PERIPHERALS THU' 
'EGIC SIMULATIONS AVALON HILL .. 



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At Mimic we believe that you and your computer should 
dictate the choices ot hardware and software you can use. 

The Spartan'" was developed to allow you to choose the 
hardware and software that best suits your needs. 

Our goal in designing the Spartan '" was simple. 
To take what you already have and give you more. 

Mimic Systems is proud to give you the Spartan "" 
The Apple'" II I emulator for the Commodore 64'" 



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Spartan '" Suggested Retail Prices: 
The Spartan™ (includes buss, CPU, and DOS cards) S599.00 

BUSS card $299.00 



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CPU card (requires buss card) S 199.00 
DOS card (requires buss and CPU card) S 1 99.00 j 

[All prices In U.S. Funds. F-roight not Included.) 

AmorJcan f icprosi. Vlr.a anO MoslorCartl cjccoplQd. 
CotTtuvjiiottj, 6A tjti'i CoinrrtoiJorir \fi{i</ ntn U'Kiimi'nV^ of (:i>uitivtti(ii'} M'lr.tcjulc!. Ili] Qiul'tit 
ComrnodOfH Bmlf rfm Mtif;li(fiov Ua. Appio* lU li u (rotlrjinurd of Appl'r Computur. Irtc. 
SpOf lao" It o Uwhimuiit r,t Mimic bysldriia Inc , fjnd lias no nMoclfi*lofi wllti Commodoio 
ElOCtronlo oi Applo Cornpultir. Iiic tho'lipurlun li rnanufanlufod t>y Mimic SyiilCim^ Uk < 

undw ltr,nriiQ graniocl by AlO tloctronlci lr>c. or Vtotoila, 6 C , Conoda 



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■ FOR INFORMATION WRI. 

MIMIC SYSTEMS INC. 

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V I C [ O R I A . BJ. C . ■: 
CANADA V8V4V2 



To Order Call: 

1-800-MODULAR 

' (663-8527) 






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TEST DRIVE 
AN ELEPHANT. 




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Elephant Floppy Disks arc ■". perfect vehicle for storing and pro- 
neccing data. Because Elephant nt^er forgets. You'll Bet high performance 
chat's 100% guaranteed for a lifetime of heavy use. So take them for a test 
drive. They re available now at your local computer showroom. And 
there's no waiting for delivery For the Elephant dealer nearest you call 
j 1-800-343-8413. In Massachusetts, call collect 1617) 769-8150 

ELEPHANT NEVER FORGETS.